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As it seems the GridLayout will always push its children to layout corresponding to their needs. for instance the following declaration:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<GridLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    android:columnCount="3"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:rowCount="4"
    android:useDefaultMargins="true" >
...
    <ImageView
        android:id="@+id/main_image"
        android:layout_column="1"
        android:layout_columnSpan="2"
        android:layout_row="3"
        android:scaleType="fitStart" />
</GridLayout>

The GridLayout declares fill_parent and as such I would expect it to not overflow. The GridLayout should take the size of the parent which in this case is the window (full height). However in hierarchy viewer the GridLayout is set as Wrap_content for both vertical and horizontal.

As such the ImageView (which is a large image) or any text view will be push to fit themself and as such overflow the container.

This can be seen within the hierarchy viewer where the container grid view fits the parent:

container grid view

while the image view overflow

image view

Reading the documentation, I understand there is a need to set gravity. As far as I can try, I used all kinds of gravity options and image scaling options without much effect. Removing the margins with useDefaultMargins="false" does change the layout overflow which leads the issue towards gridlayout.

My question follows:

  • Is this a bug or am I using the GridLayout incorrectly
  • How can I force the GridLayout's children to fit their container and to fill remaining spaces
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I have this same issue, unless I give the first element an explicit height, it takes up the whole parent and pushes the rest of the surface... –  sethro Apr 16 '12 at 20:58

1 Answer 1

The trick in other layouts is to give the first element an android:layout_weight="1.0" and nothing to the other elements. Why it works I have no idea, but it does. Here's a simple XML that displayed an ImageView, a TextView and a Button. Without the layout_weight parameter assigned to the ImageView the text and button were shifted down.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    android:background="@color/white"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:keepScreenOn = "true" >

    <ImageView
        android:id="@+id/imageView_surprise"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="0dip"
        android:scaleType="centerInside"
        android:contentDescription="@string/accessibility_imageView_surprise"
        android:layout_weight="1.0" />

    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:orientation="vertical"
        android:layout_gravity="bottom" >

        <TextView
            android:id="@+id/textView_message"
            android:layout_width="fill_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:textColor="@color/black"
            android:textSize="24sp"
            android:gravity="center_horizontal" />

        <Button
            android:id="@+id/button_share"
            style="@style/button_text"
            android:layout_width="fill_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

    </LinearLayout>

</LinearLayout>
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