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Superclass is an NSOperation class which implements NSXMLParserDelegate - all it does is sending URL request and parsing XML data returned from a server. This class is being inherited by a subclass which also implements NSXMLParserDelegate. The parent's parser delegate is supposed to catch general error from the XML response before passing it on to child's parser delegate to do more specific parsing.

Within the superclass:

@implementation Super

#pragma mark NSOperation method
- (void) main {
     id parentDelegate = [self getParserDelegate]; //?
     id childDelegate = [self getParserDelegate]; //??
}

// I would like this to return parser delegate in the super class
- (id) getParserDelegate {
     return self;
}

@end

Within subclass:

@implementation Sub

// main is not overidden in subclass

// and this should return parser delegate in the sub class
- (id) getParserDelegate {
     return self;
}

@end

I'm instantiating the operation using the child's class i.e. Sub

Sub *theSub = [[Sub alloc] init];
[self.queue addOperation:theSub]; // Super's main method will be called

Within Super's main method I would like to have access to both parent and child's delegate but I found that 'self' always resolves to Sub, regardless whether 'self' is called within Sub or Super. Is it possible to call Super's getParserDelegate from within Super's main or is it just a bad design?

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2 Answers

self is a pointer directly to the object. So it resolves to the same thing no matter where you inspect it along the inheritance chain. There is no such thing as a self pointer that would resolve directly to the superclass — that's the difference between the 'is a' school of extending object functionality and 'has a'.

Any messages issued to self will always be sent first to the most junior child class, then work their way up per the usual inheritance rules. As a result there's absolutely nothing you can provide to NSXMLParser that would cause delegate methods to go straight in to the super class.

I'd suggest that what you're describing with a common actor that implements most of the logic and a separate actor that does twiddly specifics is itself the delegate pattern. So what you probably want is to turn what you currently have as a parent into its own sovereign class and attach what you currently have as the child to it as a delegate. Just reuse the NSXMLParserDelegate protocol for that delegation relationship if it makes sense.

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Thanks heaps - that just cleared my confusion about 'self'. I think I get what you're saying about breaking the inheritance and have the subclass as a delegate to the main parser delegate. That could work but the inheritance must be in place so I'll think of some workaround like perhaps moving the parser delegate out of Super into a separate class. –  user1187378 Feb 3 '12 at 12:32
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Super class never know about what its child's, and what they do.

//in Super.h
- (id) getParserDelegate;

//in Super.m
- (id) getParserDelegate {
    return self;
}

//in Child.h
- (id) getParserDelegate;

//in Child.m
- (id) getParserDelegate {
    return [super getParserDelegate];
}
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