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I have a char [], and I want to set the value of every index to the same char value.
There is the obvious way to do it (iteration):

  char f = '+';
  char [] c = new char [50];
  for(int i = 0; i < c.length; i++){
      c[i] = f;
  }

But I was wondering if there's a way that I can utilize System.arraycopy or something equivalent that would bypass the need to iterate. Is there a way to do that?

EDIT : From Arrays.java

public static void fill(char[] a, int fromIndex, int toIndex, char val) {
        rangeCheck(a.length, fromIndex, toIndex);
        for (int i = fromIndex; i < toIndex; i++)
            a[i] = val;
    }

This is exactly the same process, which shows that there might not be a better way to do this.
+1 to everyone who suggested fill anyway - you're all correct and thank you.

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The version of the JDK code in your addendum shows a "swizzle" that is done in some versions of the JDK: An external flag somewhere indicates that array bounds checking should be bypassed in the method, and then an explicit bounds check is added, outside the loop. This provides a significant performance boost, since bounds checking is not only expensive in its own right, but it complicates other optimizations. –  Hot Licks Feb 3 '12 at 17:19
    
@Bombe it's for a custom password field, so I have to replace every char in the document with '•' on the fly - which means it has to be as responsive as possible. Might say why not set value for each index as you go? It's for using with drawString, so I can anti-alias the •'s text. fill seems to work well. :) –  paranoid-android Feb 4 '12 at 0:28
    
@paranoid-android, so you do have users that are able to type more than 1000 characters per second? I am impressed. –  Bombe Feb 4 '12 at 2:14
    
Yeah, I'm coding for Superman. –  paranoid-android Feb 4 '12 at 2:21
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10 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Try Arrays.fill(c, f): Arrays javadoc

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4  
The source for Arrays.fill suggests that it just does a loop (plus a range check beforehand). Should benchmark to see if the JVM does something clever instead... –  DNA Feb 3 '12 at 12:40
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Use Arrays.fill

  char f = '+';
  char [] c = new char [50];
  Arrays.fill(c, f)
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If you have another array of char, char[] b and you want to replace c with b, you can use c=b.clone();.

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Or, if your arrays are variable length, create a "super long" prototype and use System.arraycopy. Either will effectively do a memcpy below the covers. –  Hot Licks Feb 3 '12 at 12:42
    
@HotLicks Interesting... –  Dragos Feb 3 '12 at 13:01
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Java Programmer's FAQ Part B Sect 6 suggests:

public static void bytefill(byte[] array, byte value) {
    int len = array.length;
    if (len > 0)
    array[0] = value;
    for (int i = 1; i < len; i += i)
        System.arraycopy( array, 0, array, i,
            ((len - i) < i) ? (len - i) : i);
}

This essentially makes log2(array.length) calls to System.arraycopy which hopefully utilizes an optimized memcpy implementation.

However, is this technique still required on modern Java JITs such as the Oracle/Android JIT?

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System.arraycopy is my answer. Please let me know is there any better ways. Thx

private static long[] r1 = new long[64];
private static long[][] r2 = new long[64][64];

/**Proved:
 * {@link Arrays#fill(long[], long[])} makes r2 has 64 references to r1 - not the answer;
 * {@link Arrays#fill(long[], long)} sometimes slower than deep 2 looping.<br/>
 */
private static void testFillPerformance() {
    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss");
    System.out.println(sdf.format(new Date()));
    Arrays.fill(r1, 0l);

    long stamp0 = System.nanoTime();
    //      Arrays.fill(r2, 0l); -- exception
    long stamp1 = System.nanoTime();
    //      System.out.println(String.format("Arrays.fill takes %s nano-seconds.", stamp1 - stamp0));

    stamp0 = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < 64; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < 64; j++)
            r2[i][j] = 0l;
    }
    stamp1 = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(String.format("Arrays' 2-looping takes %s nano-seconds.", stamp1 - stamp0));

    stamp0 = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < 64; i++) {
        System.arraycopy(r1, 0, r2[i], 0, 64);
    }
    stamp1 = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(String.format("System.arraycopy looping takes %s nano-seconds.", stamp1 - stamp0));

    stamp0 = System.nanoTime();
    Arrays.fill(r2, r1);
    stamp1 = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(String.format("One round Arrays.fill takes %s nano-seconds.", stamp1 - stamp0));

    stamp0 = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < 64; i++)
        Arrays.fill(r2[i], 0l);
    stamp1 = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(String.format("Two rounds Arrays.fill takes %s nano-seconds.", stamp1 - stamp0));
}

12:33:18
Arrays' 2-looping takes 133536 nano-seconds.
System.arraycopy looping takes 22070 nano-seconds.
One round Arrays.fill takes 9777 nano-seconds.
Two rounds Arrays.fill takes 93028 nano-seconds.

12:33:38
Arrays' 2-looping takes 133816 nano-seconds.
System.arraycopy looping takes 22070 nano-seconds.
One round Arrays.fill takes 17042 nano-seconds.
Two rounds Arrays.fill takes 95263 nano-seconds.

12:33:51
Arrays' 2-looping takes 199187 nano-seconds.
System.arraycopy looping takes 44140 nano-seconds.
One round Arrays.fill takes 19555 nano-seconds.
Two rounds Arrays.fill takes 449219 nano-seconds.

12:34:16
Arrays' 2-looping takes 199467 nano-seconds.
System.arraycopy looping takes 42464 nano-seconds.
One round Arrays.fill takes 17600 nano-seconds.
Two rounds Arrays.fill takes 170971 nano-seconds.

12:34:26
Arrays' 2-looping takes 198907 nano-seconds.
System.arraycopy looping takes 24584 nano-seconds.
One round Arrays.fill takes 10616 nano-seconds.
Two rounds Arrays.fill takes 94426 nano-seconds.

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1  
Why did you pick System.arraycopy(...) when your logs state that Arrays.fill(...) was faster every run? Generally, it was massively faster! –  ingyhere Apr 29 at 9:38
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Arrays.fill might suit your needs

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Arrays.fill(myArray, 'c');

Arrays.fill

Although it is quite possible that this is doing the loop in the background and is therefore not any more efficient than what you have (other than the lines of code savings). If you really care about efficiency, try the following in comparison to the above:

int size = 50;
char[] array = new char[size];
for (int i=0; i<size; i++){
  array[i] = 'c';
}

Notice that the above doesn't call array.size() for each iteration.

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The reference to array.length is cheap (not a call) and is easily optimized out of the loop. –  Hot Licks Feb 3 '12 at 12:47
    
@HotLicks Are you sure that the compiler does this? Isn't it possible for the array reference to change (and therefore the size) within the loop? Therefore would it be safe for the compiler to optimize this out? I suppose if it were smart enough to ensure that the array reference is not modified inside the loop it could do so. Again, do you have some knowledge that this optimization is being done? –  John B Feb 3 '12 at 12:50
    
@HotLicks Can I assume your statement holds try of arrays but not collections? –  John B Feb 3 '12 at 12:50
    
array is not changed in the loop -- very easy for the compiler to determine. And the arraylength bytecode directly references the array size field in the array object, so it's virtually as cheap if left in the loop as if moved out. Even Sun's own code (in my post) doesn't worry about moving the reference out of the loop. The biggest performance boost is obtained in the more optimized version of Sun's code shown in the addendum to Paranoid's original -- there a special/secret flag on the method turns off bounds checking, and explicit bounds checking is done outside the loop. –  Hot Licks Feb 3 '12 at 17:15
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See Arrays.fill method:

char f = '+';
char [] c = new char [50];
Arrays.fill(c, f);
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   /**
     * Assigns the specified char value to each element of the specified array
     * of chars.
     *
     * @param a the array to be filled
     * @param val the value to be stored in all elements of the array
     */
    public static void fill(char[] a, char val) {
        for (int i = 0, len = a.length; i < len; i++)
            a[i] = val;
    }

That's the way Arrays.fill does it.

(I suppose you could drop into JNI and use memset.)

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You could use arraycopy but it depends on whether you can predefine the source array, - do you need a different character fill each time, or are you filling arrays repeatedly with the same char?

Clearly the length of the fill matters - either you need a source that is bigger than all possible destinations, or you need a loop to repeatedly arraycopy a chunk of data until the destination is full.

    char f = '+';
    char[] c = new char[50];
    for (int i = 0; i < c.length; i++)
    {
        c[i] = f;
    }

    char[] d = new char[50];
    System.arraycopy(c, 0, d, 0, d.length);
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