Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Python 3 class method for rescaling values that looks like this:

class A(object):
    """docstring for A"""
    def __init__(self):
        super(A, self).__init__()

    def rescale(self, old_min, old_max, new_min, new_max, value):
         """rescales a value given a current old_min and 
         old_max to the desired new_min and new_max"""
         scale = (old_max - old_min) / (new_max - new_min)
         rescaled_value = new_min + ((value - old_min) / (scale))
         return rescaled_value 

Using Python 3, this method works like this:

>>> import A
>>> x = A()
>>> x.rescale(1,10,1,100,5)
45.0

In Python 2.7, this code does not work:

>>> from __future__ import division
>>> x = A()
>>> x.rescale(1,10,1,100,5)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "bunsen.py", line 35, in rescale
rescaled_value = new_min + ((value - old_min) / (scale))
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

If I manually do this math in Python 2.7 I get the correct answer:

>>> from __future__ import division
>>> scale = (10 - 1) / (100 - 1)
>>> rescaled_value = 1 + ((5 - 1) / (scale))
>>> rescaled_value
45.0

Can anyone point out why this method does not work in Python 2.7?

share|improve this question
1  
I doubt you executed the last code manually in 2.7. Integer division in 2.7 will yield an integer, not float, and 9/99 will result in 0. Have a look at python.org/dev/peps/pep-0238 –  Felix Kling Feb 3 '12 at 12:41
    
@FelixKling See my edit. I originally forgot from __future__ import division –  drbunsen Feb 3 '12 at 12:45
    
@dr.bunsen: Please note that, yes, you will get the error with the code you show. But the answers point out that you need to have the from __future__ import division in the file that defines A.rescale(). I do not believe you have that. –  Lennart Regebro Feb 3 '12 at 17:43
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You need to set from __future__ import division in the file that contains the divisions, i.e. in the file with A.

share|improve this answer
    
I have from __future__ import division in the file and I do not believe that this is the problem. –  drbunsen Feb 3 '12 at 12:49
    
Well, I've said exactly that. –  wRAR Feb 3 '12 at 12:53
    
@wRAR - this is most certainly the correct answer. Failing to have his import in the file containing the class defintion for A would yield the problem you are reporting –  jsbueno Feb 3 '12 at 13:12
    
For some reason the OP deleted his comment stating that my suggestion fiexed his problem. –  wRAR Feb 3 '12 at 15:40
    
I've tested the code as given, and it works under 2.7 as well as Python 3. Removing the __future__ makes it fail as described in the question. I believe you are correct. This is the problem. –  Lennart Regebro Feb 3 '12 at 17:41
add comment

For python 2.7 you can either:

    x.rescale(1.0, 10.0, 1.0, 100.0, 5.0)

Or you could explicitly cast to float in division inside method.

    scale = float((old_max - old_min)) / (new_max - new_min)

Or another way is to import from __future__ import division.

This is because in python 2.x integer divided by integer will result in an integer, in your case 0.

EDIT after your comment:

Make sure you do the

    from __future__ import division

IN module A, as there is where the computations are done not like you did there.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Using this code in 2.7:

from __future__ import division

class A(object):
    """docstring for A"""
    def __init__(self):
        super(A, self).__init__()

    def rescale(self, old_min, old_max, new_min, new_max, value):
         """rescales a value given a current old_min and 
         old_max to the desired new_min and new_max"""
         scale = (old_max - old_min) / (new_max - new_min)
         rescaled_value = new_min + ((value - old_min) / (scale))
         return rescaled_value 

x = A()
print x.rescale(1,10,1,100,5)

gives me:

45.0

If I remove the __future__ import I get this:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 15, in <module>
    print x.rescale(1,10,1,100,5)
  File "test.py", line 11, in rescale
    rescaled_value = new_min + ((value - old_min) / (scale))
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

You must have the from __future__ import division line in the module that defines A. Imports only affect the module they are contained in.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.