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Consider the following:

type T () =
  member x.y = 4

let a =
  let fn () (k: T) = ()
  fn ()

let b =
  let fn () (k: System.IO.Directory) = ()
  fn ()

a fails while b is ok. The error message is:

The value 'a' has been inferred to have generic type val a : ('_a -> unit) when '_a :> T Either make the arguments to 'a' explicit or, if you do not intend for it to be generic, add a type annotation

Why and how to fix that?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The error message itself tells you exactly what you need to do - add a type annotation:

let a : T -> unit = 
  let fn () (k: T) = () 
  fn () 

The reason that you see the error in the first place is that the compiler tries to generalize the definition of a (see this part of the spec), which results in the odd signature that you see in the error message.

The reason that you don't need to do this for b is that System.IO.Directory is sealed, so there is no need to generalize.

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You are facing a value restriction, because a looks like a constant but it returns a function. Have a look at this question:

Understanding F# Value Restriction Errors

One easy way to solve it is adding a variable to the definition of a.

let a x =
  let fn () (k: T) = ()
  fn () x

I don't know why with some types it works, which is the case of b

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However, adding x to the definition changes a from a function value to a function, which means that it will not be evaluated during startup. See F# values, functions and a little bit of both for a full explanation. –  John Reynolds Feb 3 '12 at 14:07

If T where a record instead of a class, it would work. But for some reason, you have to spell it out for the compiler if T is a class,

type T () =
  member x.y = 4

let a<'U when 'U :> T> =
  let fn () (k: 'U) = ()
  fn ()

let test0 = a<T> (T())  // You can be explicit about T,
let test1 = a (T())     // but you don't have to be.

edit: So I played a bit more with this, and weirdly, the compiler seems to be content with just any type restriction:

type T () =
  member x.y = 4

type S () =
  member x.z = 4.5

let a<'U when 'U :> S> =
  let fn () (k: T) = ()
  fn ()

let test = a (T())     // Is OK
let test = a<T> (T())  // Error: The type 'T' is not compatible with the type 'S'

The type S has nothing to do with anything in the code above, still the compiler is happy to just have a restriction of any kind.

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