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When programming ruby I always find myself doing this:

a = [a, b].min

This means compare a and b and store the smallest value in a. I don't like writing the code above as I have to write a twice.

I know that some non-standard dialects of C++ had an operator which did exactly this

a <?= b

Which I find very convenient. But I'm not really interested in the operator as much as I'm in the feature of avoiding repetition. I would also be happy if I could write

a.keep_max(b)

a can be a quite long variable, like my_array[indice1][indice2], and you don't want to write that twice.

I did alot of googling on this and found no result, hopefully this question will pop up and be useful for others aswell.

So, is there any non-repeitive way to express what I want in ruby?

share|improve this question
1  
IMO re-binding values (without an excellent reason for doing it) is a bad choice, just create a new variable with a different name. Think about it: now a has value 2, now some magic, a has value 1... that kind of code is harder to understand and debug. But, of course, I am a functional bigot ;-) –  tokland Feb 3 '12 at 13:36
    
@tokland, yea perhaps. But for typical dynamic programming code, say floyd-warshall, you often do exactly what I expressed. After all assignments can be the power of imperative languages. –  Tarrasch Feb 3 '12 at 13:41
1  
Fair enough, when you are inside an imperative loop you have no option but to reuse variable names (and I guess a functional implementation of that algorithm may be inefficent in Ruby). My note was just a prevention against lazy coding that reuses variable names just because. –  tokland Feb 3 '12 at 13:48
1  
@tokland, Yep. what you say is completely right. I'm a haskell fan, but I believe assignments are not always evil! Furthermore ruby isn't primarily designed for functional style (afaik). –  Tarrasch Feb 3 '12 at 17:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you would like to do is in fact not possible in ruby (see this question). I think the best you can do is

def max(*args)
  args.max
end

a = max a, b
share|improve this answer
    
The correct answer seems indeed to be that it simply isn't possible without eval tricks (which another question mentioned, thanks @kentor). –  Tarrasch Feb 4 '12 at 18:12

I don't understand your question. You can always do something like this ...

module Comparable
  def keep_min(other)
     (self <=> other) <= 0 ? self : other
  end

  def keep_max(other)
     (self <=> other) >= 0 ? self : other
  end
end

1.keep_min(2)
=> 1

1.keep_max(2)
=> 2

Well, that won't work for all objects with <=> because not all of them are implementing Comparable, so you could monkey-patch Object.

Personally I prefer clarity and tend to avoid monkey-patching. Plus, this clearly is a binary predicate, just like "+", therefore method-chaining doesn't necessarily make sense so I prefer something like this to get rid of that array syntax:

def min(*args)
   args.min
end

def max(*args)
   args.max
end

min(1, 2)
=> 1

max(1, 2)
=> 2

But hey, I'm also a Python developer :-)

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You can define your own method for it:

class Object
  def keep_max(other)
    [self, other].max
  end
end

a = 3
b = 7
puts a.keep_max(b)

But you should be careful defining methods on Object as it can have unpredictable behaviour (for example, if objects cannot be compared).

share|improve this answer
def keep_max(var, other, binding)
  eval "#{var} = [#{var}, #{other}].max", binding
end

a = 5 
b = 78
keep_max(:a, :b, binding)
puts a
#=> 78

This basically does what you want. Take a look at Change variable passed in a method

share|improve this answer
    
eval and binding for a keep_max, I would not recommend doing that –  Dorian Mar 24 '14 at 15:54
    arr = {2,4,3,6}
    min = arr[0];
    max = arr[0];
    arr1[0]=arr[1];
    arr1[1]=arr[2];
    arr1[2]=arr[3];
    arr1.each() { |val|
      if min>val
      min=val;
    end
    }
    arr1.each() { |val|
      if max<val
      max=val
    end
    }
    puts "The minimum value is #{min}"
    puts "The maximum value is #{max}"
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Harsha :) Welcome to Stack Overflow! Just to let you know, we normally advise against simply posting code in an answer. If you could edit to add a bit of context to what your answer bring, it would be greatly appreciated :). Thx ^^ –  Patrice Oct 9 '14 at 13:33

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