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I have a .dtsx file (an SSIS package) that downloads files from an FTP server and imports data. It runs fine whenever I run it manually. However, when I schedule calling the package as a step in a SQL server agent job, it fails. The step it fails at is the one where I call a .bat file. The error in the job history viewer says this:

Error: 2009-05-26 12:52:25.64
Code: 0xC0029151 Source: Execute batch file Execute Process Task
Description: In Executing "D:\xxx\import.bat" "" at "", The process exit code was "1" while the expected was "0". End Error DTExec: The package execution returned DTSER_FAILURE (1).

I think it's a permissions issue, but I'm not sure how to resolve this. The job owner is an admin user, so I've verified they have permissions to the directory where the .bat file is located. I've tried going into Services and changing the "Log On As" option for SQL Server Agent, and neither option works (Local System Account and This Account). Does anyone have ideas as to what other permissions need to be adjusted in order to get this to work?

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4 Answers 4

For me it was a permissions issue. Go to Environment --> Directories, then change Local directory to something the SQLAgentUser can access. I used C:\temp. Click the dropdown for Save, and choose "Set defaults".

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Are you executing the SSIS job in the batch file, or is the batch file a step in the SSIS control flow?

I'm assuming the latter for this answer. What task are you using to execute the batch file (e.g. simple execute program task or a script task). If the latter, it looks like your batch file is actually failing on some step, not the SSIS script. I'd check the permissions of what your batch file is trying to access

In fact, it might be a better idea to rewrite the batch file as a script task in SSIS, because you'll get much better error reporting (it'll tell you which step in the script fails).

You could try executing the batch file using the runas command in a command window. If you try and execute it under the local system or network system account, it should give you a better error. If it does error, you can check the error level by going "echo %ERRORLEVEL%".

If it wasn't the latter, and you're executing the SSIS package via a batch file, why?

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The batch file is executed in a step in SSIS. It is an Execute Process Task. The batch file runs successfully when I run from a command window. It also runs successfully when I run the SSIS package manually. This is why I think the issue has to do with permissions, maybe for MSSQLAGENT? –  Pamela May 27 '09 at 23:21
    
Are you executing the batch file via the runas command, when remoted into the server that you're executing SSIS from? This should execute it with the permissions that SSIS would execute it with. When you execute the SSIS package in visual studio, does it give you the same error? –  Dane May 27 '09 at 23:41
    
Thanks for your help, Dane! I did some troubleshooting and executed the batch file as a step in my SQL job, and I got a more helpful error message that way. From there, I was able to figure out the issue! (See my message below.) –  Pamela May 28 '09 at 0:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I tried executing just the batch file as a SQL Job step, and it gave more specifics. It showed that it failed when I was trying to call an executable, which was in the same directory as my .bat file, but not in the windows/system32 directory, which is where it was executing from.

I moved the executable to the system32 directory, but then I had no clue where my files were being downloaded to. Then I found that there's a property for the Execute Process Task (the one that executes the .bat) called WorkingDirectory. I set this to be the directory where the bat is located, moved the executable back into the same one as the .bat file, and it's now working as expected.

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Are you possibly accessing a mapped drive in your .bat file? If so, you can't rely on the mapped drive from within the service, so you'd have to use UNC path.

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No, the .bat file isn't on a mapped drive. –  Pamela May 27 '09 at 23:21

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