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I have some code that I'm trying to work on...

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
  std::cout << "Hello. Welcome to Delicious Drive Up. What would you like to order?\n";
  std::cout << "\nOur menu is-";
  std::cout << "...";
  std::cout << "\nOrder here > ";
  std::string choice;
  std::getline(cin, choice);
  if (choice == 'hamburger' || choice == 'Hamburger')
  {
      std::cout << "We don't have any ham. Is a Chickenburger all right? y/n. > ";
      std::string opt;
      std::getline(cin, opt);
      if (opt == 'y' || opt == 'Y' || opt == 'yes' || opt = 'Yes')
      {
          std::cout << "Here's your chickenburger.";
      }
  }
}

This was adapted from a Bash script I wrote and is one of my first C++ programs. When I compile this, it comes up with these errors...

test.cpp:19:15: warning: character constant too long for its type
test.cpp:19:40: warning: character constant too long for its type
test.cpp:23:44: warning: multi-character character constant
test.cpp:23:59: warning: multi-character character constant
test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test.cpp:19: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘choice == 1919378802’
test.cpp:19: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘choice == 1919378802’
test.cpp:23: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘opt == 'y'’
test.cpp:23: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘opt == 'Y'’
test.cpp:23: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘opt == 7955827’

Could you explain what these mean and how to fix them?

EDIT: I get a new error message now...

.test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
.test.cpp:23: error: no match for ‘operator||’ in ‘((std::operator== [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>](((const std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >&)((const std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >*)(& opt))), ((const char*)"y")) || std::operator== [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>](((const std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >&)((const std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >*)(& opt))), ((const char*)"Y"))) || std::operator== [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>, _Alloc = std::allocator<char>](((const std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >&)((const std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >*)(& opt))), ((const char*)"yes"))) || opt’
.test.cpp:23: note: candidates are: operator||(bool, bool) <built-in>
share|improve this question
1  
Just to clarify it, C++ is not a scripting language, so this is not actually a script. –  Niklas R Feb 3 '12 at 14:25
    
The errors would be more useful if we knew where actually line 19 is, etc. It doesn't seem to equal the line numbers in the code which leads me to the assumption you have modified the code before posting? –  Niklas R Feb 3 '12 at 14:28
    
@NiklasR Could you explain? Also, I didn't say that it was. I said it was a program. Is that wrong too? –  CoffeeRain Feb 3 '12 at 14:35
3  
You do know that hamburgers are not made from ham, right ? The name comes from the city of Hamburg in Germany. –  Paul R Feb 3 '12 at 14:45
    
@PaulR Yes I do. :) –  CoffeeRain Feb 3 '12 at 14:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

As others have pointed out, you need to use double quotes ("y" instead of 'y') for your strings, otherwise they are character literals.

In C/C++, there is such a thing as a multi-character literal; its value is a number made up of somehow putting the character codes for the individual characters together in some implementation-defined way. You don't want to ever use them unless you have a really really good reason. They only reason you need to know about them is to understand the warnings and error messages:

test.cpp:19: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘choice == 1919378802’

... means that there is no way to compare a string with the number 1919378802, which is what your compiler interprets 'hamburger' to mean.

Once that is fixed, your new error message:

.test.cpp:23: error: no match for ‘operator||’ in ...
.test.cpp:23: note: candidates are: operator||(bool, bool) <built-in>

means that something went wrong with one of the || operators. Maybe one of its operands wasn't actually a boolean expression. The "note" tells you that there is a built-in || for two bools, but that it couldn't be used in this situation.

Solution: Replace opt = 'Yes' by opt == "Yes".

The single =, assignment, means that the result of that expression is not a bool but a string, and there is no operator|| for or-ing a boolean with a string.

Style Note: It's usually considered better style to not use a using namespace std declaration. Instead, explicitly refer to standard library stuff (cout, endl, string, getline) using a std:: prefix, as in std::string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Just came up with the same answer in the C++ chat –  CoffeeRain Feb 3 '12 at 15:01
    
Thanks for such a great answer ! –  deXter Oct 24 at 7:30

You're using single quotes to enclose a string. You need to change

if (choice == 'hamburger' || choice == 'Hamburger')

to

if (choice == "hamburger" || choice == "Hamburger")

The same thing applies to 'Yes' and 'yes', of course.

As for the second problem, you're trying to compare a single character with a string. You need to consider your 'Y' as a string too:

if (opt == "y" || opt == "Y" || opt == "yes" || opt == "Yes")
       //  ^^^ Note the double quotes also on single characters
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I am really a Python person, so I always put strings in single quotes. –  CoffeeRain Feb 3 '12 at 14:28
1  
I hope you have a really good reason for trying to teach yourself C++, then. –  Karl Knechtel Feb 3 '12 at 14:37
    
Please read my edit. –  CoffeeRain Feb 3 '12 at 14:39
    
@KarlKnechtel I basically just wanted to learn it to see if I wanted to. Some good low libraries are available for both C and C++, so I thought it would be interesting... –  CoffeeRain Feb 3 '12 at 14:40
    
@CoffeeRain edited my answer, take a look. –  Narrakan Feb 3 '12 at 14:44

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