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Consider the following code:

#include    <iostream>
#include    <typeinfo>
#include    <cstring>
#include    <cstdlib>

static void random_string( char *s, const int len )
{
    static const char alphanum[] =
        "0123456789"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

    for ( int i = 0; i < len; ++i )
        s[ i ] = alphanum[ rand( ) % ( sizeof( alphanum ) - 1 ) ];

    s[ len ] = 0;
}

template< typename Type, int Length >
void    info( Type ( &var )[ Length ] )
{
    std::cout << "->    Type is " << typeid( var ).name( ) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "->    Pointer size:   " << sizeof( Type * ) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "->    Number of elements: " << Length << std::endl;
    std::cout << "->    Size of each element:   " << sizeof( Type ) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "->    contents: \"" << var << "\"." << std::endl;
}


template< typename SourceType, int SourceLength, typename TargetType, int TargetLength >
void    func( TargetType ( &target )[ TargetLength ] )
{
    SourceType  source[ SourceLength ];

    random_string( ( char * )source, SourceLength - 1 );

    std::cout << "-= source =-" << std::endl;
    info( source );

    std::cout << "-= target =-" << std::endl;
    info( target );

    std::memcpy( target, source,
            ( SourceLength < TargetLength ? SourceLength : TargetLength ) );
}

int main( )
{
    typedef char    char16[ 16 ];
    typedef char    char64[ 64 ];

    char16  c16 = "16 bytes chars.";
    char64  c64 = "64 bytes chars. There's a lot more room here...";

    std::cout << "c16 = \"" << c16 << "\"." << std::endl;
    func< char64, sizeof( char64 ) >( c16 );
    std::cout << "c16 = \"" << c16 << "\"." << std::endl;

    std::cout << "c64 = \"" << c64 << "\"." << std::endl;
    func< char16, sizeof( char16 ) >( c64 );
    std::cout << "c64 = \"" << c64 << "\"." << std::endl;

    return  0;
}

And this output:

> g++ -Wall -g3 array_conversions.cpp -o array_conversions
> ./array_inner_type
c16 = "16 bytes chars.".
-= source =-
->      Type is A64_A64_c
->      Pointer size:   8
->      Number of elements:     64
->      Size of each element:   64
->      contents: "0x7fff8b913380".
-= target =-
->      Type is A16_c
->      Pointer size:   8
->      Number of elements:     16
->      Size of each element:   1
->      contents: "16 bytes chars.".
c16 = "fa37JncCHryDsbza".
c64 = "64 bytes chars. There's a lot more room here...".
-= source =-
->      Type is A16_A16_c
->      Pointer size:   8
->      Number of elements:     16
->      Size of each element:   16
->      contents: "0x7fff8b914280".
-= target =-
->      Type is A64_c
->      Pointer size:   8
->      Number of elements:     64
->      Size of each element:   1
->      contents: "64 bytes chars. There's a lot more room here...".
c64 = "Z2nOXpPIhMFSv8k".

As we can see, the understanding of what SourceType source[ SourceLength ] is for me and GCC is not the same.

I expected SourceType source[ SourceLength ] to be of type char64 ("A64_c"), but GCC tells me it is "A64_A64_c" and acts as if it was an array of char64 or something like.

Strangely it only happens to the local source variable. The target function parameter is correctly interpreted.

What I am missing? Is there any misunderstanding in my code?

I feel this problem is related to this one C++ Template argument changes Reference to Pointer, posted by myself almost one year ago, but this question had no answer anyhow, so now I beg you please for any help.

Really thanks.

share|improve this question
    
you wrote too much code, please be more concise by removing uninteresting parts from the code. –  vulkanino Feb 3 '12 at 16:19

2 Answers 2

c16 has type char[16]

func< char64, sizeof( char64 ) >( c16 ) instantiates func with

SourceType == char64 == char[64]
SourceLength == sizeof( char64 ) == 64
TargetType == char
TargetLength == 16

This means that target has type char (&)[16] and source has type char[64][64].

This explains why target is an array of char, and source is an array of arrays of char

share|improve this answer

Sorry, sorry..

It was really my fault. The solution, in fact, is really simpler than what I was trying to do. I've just seen it thanks to the words of a friend.

Unfortunately he is not logged in, so I'll simply paste a working version of the same code:

#include    <iostream>
#include    <typeinfo>
#include    <cstring>
#include    <cstdlib>


static void random_string( char *s, const int len )
{
    static const char alphanum[] =
        "0123456789"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

    for ( int i = 0; i < len; ++i )
        s[ i ] = alphanum[ rand( ) % ( sizeof( alphanum ) - 1 ) ];

    s[ len ] = 0;
}

template< typename Type, int Length >
void    info( Type ( &var )[ Length ] )
{
    std::cout << "->    Type is " << typeid( var ).name( ) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "->    Pointer size:   " << sizeof( Type * ) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "->    Number of elements: " << Length << std::endl;
    std::cout << "->    Size of each element:   " << sizeof( Type ) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "->    contents: \"" << var << "\"." << std::endl;
}


template< typename SourceType, typename TargetType >
void    func( TargetType ( &target ) )
{
    std::cout << __FUNCTION__ << std::endl;

    SourceType  source;

    random_string( ( char * )source, sizeof( SourceType ) - 1 );

    std::cout << "-= source =-" << std::endl;
    info( source );

    std::cout << "-= target =-" << std::endl;
    info( target );

    std::memcpy( target, source,
            ( sizeof( SourceType ) < sizeof( TargetType ) ?
                sizeof( SourceType ) : sizeof( TargetType ) ) );
}


int main( )
{
    typedef char    char16[ 16 ];
    typedef char    char64[ 64 ];

    char16  c16 = "16 bytes chars.";
    char64  c64 = "64 bytes chars. There's a lot more room here...";

    std::cout << "c16 = \"" << c16 << "\"." << std::endl;
    func< char64 >( c16 );
    std::cout << "c16 = \"" << c16 << "\"." << std::endl;

    std::cout << "c64 = \"" << c64 << "\"." << std::endl;
    func< char16 >( c64 );
    std::cout << "c64 = \"" << c64 << "\"." << std::endl;

    return  0;
}

Output:

> ./array_inner_type 
c16 = "16 bytes chars.".
func
-= source =-
->      Type is A64_c
->      Pointer size:   8
->      Number of elements:     64
->      Size of each element:   1
->      contents: "fa37JncCHryDsbzayy4cBWDxS22JjzhMaiRrV41mtzxlYvKWrO72tK0LK0e1zLO".
-= target =-
->      Type is A16_c
->      Pointer size:   8
->      Number of elements:     16
->      Size of each element:   1
->      contents: "16 bytes chars.".
c16 = "fa37JncCHryDsbza".
c64 = "64 bytes chars. There's a lot more room here...".
func
-= source =-
->      Type is A16_c
->      Pointer size:   8
->      Number of elements:     16
->      Size of each element:   1
->      contents: "Z2nOXpPIhMFSv8k".
-= target =-
->      Type is A64_c
->      Pointer size:   8
->      Number of elements:     64
->      Size of each element:   1
->      contents: "64 bytes chars. There's a lot more room here...".
c64 = "Z2nOXpPIhMFSv8k".

Sorry again, people...

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