Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a new function called removeInelligibleCharsFromTargetName.

void removeInelligibleCharsFromTargetName(string *targetName)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < targetName->length(); i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < ineligibleChars.length(); j++)
        {
            if(targetName[i] == ineligibleChars[j])
                targetName[i] = '_';
        }
    }
}

The problem is when I try the comparison in the if loop I get the following error:

error C2678: binary '==' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'std::string' (or there is no acceptable conversion) 32> c:\program files\microsoft sdks\windows\v6.0a\include\guiddef.h(192): could be 'int operator ==(const GUID &,const GUID &)' while trying to match the argument list '(std::string, char)'

But put that exact same nested loop back where I call it instead of calling the function it works fine.

Can someone tell me whey it won't work in a function but works fine outside the function. No doubt its something about it being a pointer but I dont know what.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Why are you passing a pointer to a string? That's a really bad idea. Pass a reference.

void removeInelligibleCharsFromTargetName(string& targetName)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < targetName.length(); i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < ineligibleChars.length(); j++)
        {
            if(targetName[i] == ineligibleChars[j])
                targetName[i] = '_';
        }
    }
}

The problem is that when you have a pointer, targetName[i] is the same as *(targetName+i). That is the equivalent of indexing into an array of strings. If you don't have an array of strings this would only lead to undefined behaviour. You were lucky that the code doesn't compile (can't compare a string with a character) and the compiler caught the error. If it happened to compile, when you ran it you would probably observe some very strange behaviour.

When you have a string, or a reference to one, targetName[i] invokes the operator[] on the string, which indexes into the string and actually gives you a character.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you spotted the bug:). –  Charles Beattie Feb 3 '12 at 16:33
    
I really dont know. Its late Friday evening is all i got....... Thanks –  discodowney Feb 3 '12 at 16:35
add comment

Change every occurrence of targetName[i] to (*targetName)[i]. Or, just do as R. Martinho Fernandes suggests and pass a reference rather than a pointer.

share|improve this answer
add comment

When targetName is a pointer, this code

if(targetName[i] == ineligibleChars[j])
    targetName[i] = '_';

tries to index from the pointer, like it had been (a pointer to) an array. To get access to the string actually pointed to, you need to dereference the pointer before indexing into the string

if((*targetName)[i] == ineligibleChars[j])
    (*targetName)[i] = '_';
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.