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I think I'm missing something basic here. Why is the third IF condition true? Shouldn't the condition evaluate to false? I want to do something where the id is not 1, 2 or 3.

var id = 1;
if(id == 1) //true    
if(id != 1) //false 
if(id != 1 || id != 2 || id != 3) //this returns true. why?

Thank you.

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3  
because id does not equal 2 or 3? false || true || true == true –  32bitkid Feb 3 '12 at 17:11
1  
1 != 2 .. this is obviously true.. lollzzz –  dku.rajkumar Feb 3 '12 at 17:12
    
because id > 3 , imo. –  ddacot Feb 3 '12 at 17:13
    
Then it should return false, I think? Sorry, I've been working all night so not able to think clearly. –  tempid Feb 3 '12 at 17:13
    
Or vs And –  32bitkid Feb 3 '12 at 17:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

With an OR (||) operation, if any one of the conditions are true, the result is true.

I think you want an AND (&&) operation here.

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Thank you. Now I feel stupid for asking this question :( I got confused. –  tempid Feb 3 '12 at 17:27
5  
Ha. We've all been there, trust me. –  Gabe Feb 3 '12 at 17:28

You want to execute code where the id is not (1 or 2 or 3), but the OR operator does not distribute over id. The only way to say what you want is to say

the id is not 1, and the id is not 2, and the id is not 3.

which translates to

if (id !== 1 && id !== 2 && id !== 3)

or alternatively for something more pythonesque:

if (!(id in [,1,2,3]))
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2  
+1 for bottom construct. –  user66001 Mar 26 at 14:34

Each of the three conditions is evaluated independently[1]:

id != 1 // false
id != 2 // true
id != 3 // true

Then it evaluates false || true || true, which is true (a || b is true if either a or b is true). I think you want

id != 1 && id != 2 && id != 3

which is only true if the ID is not 1 AND it's not 2 AND it's not 3.

[1]: This is not strictly true, look up short-circuit evaluation. In reality, only the first two clauses are evaluated because that is all that is necessary to determine the truth value of the expression.

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because the OR operator will return true if any one of the conditions is true, and in your code there are two conditions that are true.

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When it checks id!=2 it returns true and stops further checking

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1  
This is important to note too; it comes in handy if you need to see if an object exists before checking a parameter. if(obj != null && obj.field == 2) –  Jeffrey Sweeney Feb 3 '12 at 17:18
    
-1 - An interesting side point, but not the root problem. –  user66001 Mar 26 at 14:37

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