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I have a list of strings and I want to dump them out as a string with semi-colon delimiters.

IEnumerable<string> foo = from f in fooList
                          where f.property == "bar"
                          select f.title;

I now want to output this:

title1;title2;title3;title4

How do I do that?

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Possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/122670/… –  Paul Feb 3 '12 at 17:45
1  
Not sure why you need to use linq to perform that...just use string.join like suggested. –  Rig Feb 3 '12 at 17:46
    
@Rig he probably expected a built-in reduce method, because most functional languages come with it. And indeed Aggregate is LINQ's reduce implementation. –  Jan Mar 19 at 17:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
string result = string.Join(";", fooList.Where(x=>x.property == "bar").Select(x=>x.title));
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Use the String.Join Method

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+1: first in, not as detailed, but still pipped 'em at the post. –  TrueBlueAussie May 15 '12 at 15:22
    
Thanks. With a quick response, you can't always be detailed :) –  mservidio May 15 '12 at 15:31
    
True, but you can edit it for up to 2 minutes afterwards, before it even says "edited" :) –  TrueBlueAussie May 15 '12 at 20:05
    
I didn't realize that, thanks. –  mservidio May 15 '12 at 21:01

Using LINQ instead of String.Join as that was what was asked for. Though really String.Join is probably a safer / easier bet.

IEnumerable<string> foo = from f in fooList
                      where f.property == "bar"
                      select f.title;
string join = foo.Aggregate((s, n) => s + ";" + n);
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That's exactly what I was looking for: the LINQ-version of reduce. –  Jan Mar 19 at 17:53

Since .NET 2.0, the string class provides a convenient Join method. While it originally operated on arrays only, .NET 4 adds an IEnumerable overload...

IEnumerable<string> foo = from f in fooList
                          where f.property == "bar"
                          select f.title;

Console.WriteLine(string.Join(";", foo));
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It's worth mentioning that this particular overload (taking an IEnumerable as parameter) was only added in .NET 4 –  BrokenGlass Feb 3 '12 at 18:40
    
Good call - updated! –  Dan J Feb 3 '12 at 19:03

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