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I am handling a form submit like this:

$('#some-form').submit(function(ev) {
    var $form = $(this);

    $.getJSON('/some/endpoint', function(data) {
        if (data.somecondition) {
            $form.submit(); // <- not doing what I want
        }
    });

    return false;
});

So, I'm beginning an asynchronous getJSON call and then returning false to stop the form submission. Within the getJSON callback, under some condition, I want to actually submit the form. But triggering submit() just calls the handler again and repeats the process.

I know I can unbind the submit handler and then submit, but there's got to be a better way, right? If there isn't a better way, what's the best way to structure this code to unbind the submit handler?

share|improve this question
    
Just a quick guess. I would change $form.submit(); to return true; NOTE: I didn't test this yet –  Henesnarfel Feb 3 '12 at 18:34
    
@Henesnarfel, it's inside a callback function. return true there will just return from that callback. The original form submission was already cancelled with the return false in the handler function. –  Ben Lee Feb 3 '12 at 18:38
    
you are right. my mistake. Like I said it was a quick guess –  Henesnarfel Feb 3 '12 at 19:03

4 Answers 4

Don't submit the form on step 1, use a regular button, and have the onclick call your function, that way you don't have to worry about submit event management.

You can call the submit directly in your callback this way without worrying about going into a loop.

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Yeah, my co-worked had that thought too. Seems roundabout though, and I'd rather not change the mark-up (even via javascript) if I can avoid it. –  Ben Lee Feb 3 '12 at 18:48
    
Also, I still want the "enter" key to trigger the handler. –  Ben Lee Feb 3 '12 at 18:49
    
not what I went with, but +1 anyway because this solution does work –  Ben Lee Feb 3 '12 at 19:28

use a flag..

$('#some-form').submit(function(ev) {
    if($form.data("canSubmit")) return true;

    var $form = $(this),
        $form.data("canSubmit",false);

    $.getJSON('/some/endpoint', function(data) {
        if (data.somecondition) {
            $form.data("canSubmit",true);
            $form.submit(); //this time it will submit
        }
    });

    return false;
});
share|improve this answer
    
this might cause problems if your form is being used to make async calls since it activates the flag and then if you want to submit it no-async it will not work –  Raphael Isidro Oct 16 '13 at 18:22
    
async calls won't change the flag, only the submit event will, after returning from the ajax call that checks it –  Avi Pinto Oct 18 '13 at 19:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Turns out it's actually very simple, just call submit() on the non-extended version of the element:

$form.get(0).submit();

Example here: http://jsbin.com/eyuteh/7/edit#html

Caveat: See @Avi Pinto's comment.

share|improve this answer
2  
(didn't know that submitting the actual element will override the bound events, though it's logical), but this way you override the extended submit flow, for example - using jQuery.validate - if your submit event happens before jQuery.validate - you return false, stopping the validation, then trigger the submit of the form - you might submit an invalid form. in your case this might be OK but some other dev might hook a submit event to the form and be surprised that nothing works for him. –  Avi Pinto Feb 12 '12 at 7:08
    
@AviPinto, very good point. I updated to point out that Caveat. –  Ben Lee Feb 12 '12 at 17:36

You could always handle the form submission in jQuery:

$('#some-form').submit(function(ev) {
    var $form = $(this);

    $.getJSON('/some/endpoint', function(data) {
        if (data.somecondition) {
            //$form.submit(); // <- not doing what I want
            //untested, but you should get the idea
            $.ajax({
                type: 'POST',
                url: $form.attr('action'),
                data: $form.serialize(),
                success: function() { alert('success!') }
          });
        }
    });

    return false; 
});
share|improve this answer
    
But this doesn't have the same effect. It stays on the page, and also doesn't handle file uploads. –  Ben Lee Feb 3 '12 at 19:27
    
Ah makes sense, sorry wasn't more helpful. –  Jason More Feb 3 '12 at 22:27

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