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Short version: How can I drag Link 1 into one of the dropdowns under Link 3 in this demo? http://jsfiddle.net/Gdadu/2/

EDIT: The issue has been brought up about what should happen when an item is dragged over another: should it be placed to the left/right or start a new submenu? In order for the list to be fully sortable, there has to be some way to drop items into non-existing submenus, starting a new ul dropdown. I could insert an empty ul in every list item that doesn't have one yet to serve as a drop target, but the problem above still exists.

This seems a lot more difficult than I initially thought, so I apologize for not having put more effort into this yet, as I hadn't considered some of these problems. I'm willing to accept an answer to the stated issue and worry about the rest later.


I have a basic dropdown navigation list that I want to be fully sortable, using jQuery UI. Any li element should be able to move to any position in the entire list. I'm having trouble with dragging top level list items into submenus, it seems that :hover doesn't trigger on the dropdown list while in "drag mode", so the dropdowns don't appear.

Example HTML:

<ul class="dropdown">
    <li><a href="#">Link 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Link 2</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Link 3</a>
        <ul>
            <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Link</a>
                 <ul>
                    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
                    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
                    <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
                </ul>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

My CSS:

.dropdown,
.dropdown li,
.dropdown ul {
    list-style:none;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}
.dropdown {
    position:relative;
    display:block;
    z-index:10000;
}
.dropdown ul {
    position:absolute;
    top:100%;
    width:100%;
    visibility:hidden;
    display:none;
    z-index:900;
}
.dropdown ul ul {
    top:0;
    left:100%;
}
.dropdown li {
    position:relative;
    float:left;
}
.dropdown li:hover{
    z-index:910;
    cursor:default;
}
.dropdown ul:hover,
.dropdown li:hover > ul,
.dropdown a:hover + ul,
.dropdown a:focus + ul {
    visibility:visible;
    display:block;
}
.dropdown a {
    text-decoration:none;
    display:block;
    padding:.5em 2em;
    background:#cde;
    border:1px solid #ccc;
}
.dropdown ul li {
    width:100%;
}

Sortable initialization:

$('.dropdown').sortable({
    items: 'li'
});

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Gdadu/2/

For example, I want to drag "Link 1" into a submenu, but can't do it because the submenu doesn't appear while dragging, as if :hover is ignored. I'm not sure if the problem lies in the CSS or javascript. What can I do about this?

Good idea from the comments:

Perhaps you could trigger everything to expand when a drag starts

This would probably work, but I don't want the entire menu to expand. It could be a lot of content with many links and 3 levels of navigation, and would probably overlap itself with all the flyouts/dropdowns (huge mess).

share|improve this question
2  
If you're dragging something, you are hovering over what you are dragging, which is blocking the item beneath it... –  Fosco Feb 3 '12 at 19:39
    
We're still hovering over multiple elements, look here for example: jsfiddle.net/Gdadu/4 The html:hover is still triggered. In any case, I'm looking for a solution to the stated problem. –  Wesley Murch Feb 3 '12 at 19:42
    
That's only because it's already active before you drag. No new hovers will be triggered while dragging. Perhaps you could trigger everything to expand when a drag starts. –  Fosco Feb 3 '12 at 19:48
    
awesome coding mate. I really like what you did in this code. –  John Riselvato Feb 3 '12 at 20:07
    
as far as I know html has :hover always triggered because it has the elements in it. So if you have 'a' element and 'b' is child of 'a' than if you hover over 'b', 'a' will also have the :hover state hope I helped. –  19greg96 Feb 3 '12 at 20:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a fiddle that shows a few points that can help you with your implementation: http://jsfiddle.net/Gdadu/13/

It is far from perfect, and as pointed out in the comment, there is a few logical problems also with "sorting everything everywhere" :) Things not working here are sorting nested li's back to top level, sortables on nested ul's, ... but I think they are sketched out there. Distinguishing the sorting from the dragging might be one thing necessairy with jqueryui's current status. Also I shortcut your excellent css solution for the submenus and made them javascript based as to simplify things a bit.

But: You can drop link1 inside link3 or link3's nested ul ;)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm looking at this, trying to make something useful out of it. I'll let you know how I make out tomorrow night. –  Wesley Murch Feb 4 '12 at 1:52
    
Other commitments caused me to leave this task behind for probably the next 2 months, so I'm giving this the checkmark as promised. Thanks for the brave attempt, if I ever get back to this I'll be sure to post my final solution. –  Wesley Murch Feb 9 '12 at 7:54
    
You're welcome. Had a similar problem once where I'd designed a CMS interface, where you could "live" edit the navigation while browsing the site as admin. Using 'helper buttons' for different tasks like drag&drop or sort was, from a usability standpoint, the clearest solution. –  kontur Feb 9 '12 at 8:15
    
I started going in the direction of "click to edit -> change CSS class so it's easier to manage (not a dropdown) -> change back when done". I've found that drag/drop sorting really needs a "Save" button to make up for messy mistakes rather than updating on every drop. This ensures the changes are all committed at once as well. –  Wesley Murch Feb 9 '12 at 8:17
    
Yes, absolutely. Oft the technical more simple solution is also easier for the user to understand, even if a more slick technical solution could be implemented :) –  kontur Feb 9 '12 at 8:22

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