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I make use of a message bundle in one of my services in a Grails 2.0 project for internationalized text. The use case is an email subject that is sent via the mail plugin in an asynchronous way, so it really doesn't make sense to have this in a controller or TagLib (given the usual argument of not accessing your text or views in a service). This code works fine in my running Grails app, but I'm not sure how to test it.

I tried a PluginAwareResourceBundleMessageSource in my defineBeans as that is what my running application injects, but it led to nullpointers as it appears it needs a bunch of setup around plugin managers and such that my test environment is not giving (even integration).

I then tried a ReloadableResourceBundleMessageSource as it was pure Spring, but it can't seem to see my .properties files, and fails with a No message found under code 'my.email.subject' for locale 'en'.

I feel like I'm going down a wormhole a bit as accessing Grails i18n in a service is not documented in the grails docs, so if there is a preferred way to do this, let me know.

Note my .properties file is in the standard grails-app/i18n location.

The test

@TestFor(EmailHelperService)
class EmailHelperServiceTests {

    void testSubjectsDefaultLocale() {
        defineBeans {
            //messageSource(PluginAwareResourceBundleMessageSource); Leads to nullpointers
            messageSource(ReloadableResourceBundleMessageSource);

        }
        String expected = "My Expected subject Passed1 Passed2";
        String actual = service.getEmailSubjectForStandardMustGiveGiftFromBusiness(Locale.ENGLISH, Passed1 Passed2);
        assertEquals("email subject", expected, actual);

}

Service:

    class EmailHelperService {
    def messageSource;

    public String getEmailSubject(Locale locale, String param1, String param2) {
        Object[] params = [param1, param2].toArray();      
        return messageSource.getMessage("my.email.subject", params, locale );      
    }
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Is your intent to make sure that you're wired up correctly with this one test? Or are you planing on writing one for each language you support? Also is your above test a Unit test or Integration test? –  Jarred Olson Feb 3 '12 at 20:09
    
the idea was less to check the spring wiring but more to test for the various languages as they become supported, and to check the correctness of the key in the .properties, and the text. I simplified the params for the purpose of readability but testing their correctness desired. –  Pete Feb 3 '12 at 23:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

There is already a messageSource in unit tests in Grails, it is a StaticMessageSource (see http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/2.5.4/api/org/springframework/context/support/StaticMessageSource.html), you can add mock messages with the addMessage method:

messageSource.addMessage("foo.bar", request.locale, "My Message")
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Thanks, good to know - is it possible to validate with parameters using a StaticMessageSource and a Message with {0} style placeholders? –  Pete Feb 4 '12 at 20:54
    
To answer my own comment, tested with placeholders and works great. Thanks. –  Pete Feb 7 '12 at 0:26

In a unit test you could ensure that you're wired up correctly by doing something like this:

void testSubjectsDefaultLocale() {
    def messageSource = new Object()
    messageSource.metaClass.getMessage = {subject, params, locale ->
        assert "my.email.subject" == subject
        assert ["Passed1", "Passed2"] == params 
        assert Locale.ENGLISH == locale
        "It Worked!!!"
    }
    service.messageSource = messageSource
    String actual = service.getEmailSubjectForStandardMustGiveGiftFromBusiness(Locale.ENGLISH, Passed1 Passed2)
    assert "It Worked!!!" == actual
}

This will help ensure that you're wired up correctly but it will not ensure that what you're doing actually works. If you're comfortable with that then this would work for you. If you're trying to test that when you give "XYZ" to your .properties file it returns "Hello" then this will not work for you.

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Thanks for the idea. I'm less concerned about the spring wiring, but I'd like to load my actual grails .properties file (either directly or through Spring) rather than declaring it in the test, as testing the content and key correctness is something I want. –  Pete Feb 3 '12 at 23:30

In unit tests and the local side of functional tests, sometimes you want the real properties that are in the 18n directory.

This works for me:

  MessageSource getI18n() {
    // assuming the test cwd is the project dir (where application.properties is)
    URL url = new File('grails-app/i18n').toURI().toURL()
    def messageSource = new ResourceBundleMessageSource()
    messageSource.bundleClassLoader = new URLClassLoader(url)
    messageSource.basename = 'messages'
    messageSource
  }

  i18n.getMessage(key, params, locale)
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