Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is related to a question I asked previously here: How to implement chained method calls like jQuery?

I have been using the method from the check answer from some time there, and it works well. But I would like to alter the syntax for my toolkit even further.

  1. foo(firstarg).bar(secondarg); // should function as the question above.

  2. foo(onlyarg).bar // a function with one argument

  3. foo.bar(onlyarg); // should also work, when a first argument is not appropriate.

  4. foo.bar; // a function without an argument, or returns a static value.

I would like all 4 syntaxs to work off the same foo object, but lack the OOP understanding to do so. I have tried a few things, and so far I can get 1 & 2 to work, and 3 & 4 to work, but not to all work together. It also would be nice if chaining remained an option by having each function return the root object.

Edit: I clearly need to be more specific, here is what I have now:

 var main = function(obj){ this.obj = obj; };
 var tool = function(obj){ return new main(obj); };
 main.prototype = {
      alertThisPlus : function(plus){
           alert(this.obj + ' ' + plus);    
      },
      alertJustThis : function(){
           return alert(this.obj);
      }
 };

usage

 tool('hello').alertThisPlus('world'); // returns alert('hello world')
 tool().alertJustThis('hello world');  // returns alert('hello world');

what I would like is to do this:

 tool('hello').alertThisPlus('world'); // returns alert('hello world') no change
 tool.alertJustThis('hello world');  // returns alert('hello world') does not work
share|improve this question
    
This really isn't OOP... but mute point. 3 and 4 are incompatable unless bar is a function. The best you can do to make them compatable is to call bar with no arguments. Likewise with 1 and 2. –  Thomas Eding Feb 3 '12 at 19:42
1  
right. I have 1&2 working already, and I have 3&4 working already. Its getting all working at once. I know its possible because of jquery: both $(arg).foo works, as well as $.browser for instance. –  Fresheyeball Feb 3 '12 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Functions are just objects so you can add functions to 'tool'. You can do this manually:

tool.foobar = function() {}; 

Or if your classes are structured suitably you could use a mix-in approach. Something like this:

function Tool(prefix) {
  this.prefix = prefix;
}

Tool.prototype.alertThisPlus = function(suffix) {
  alert((typeof this.prefix != 'undefined' ? this.prefix + ' ' : '') + suffix);
};

Tool.prototype.alertJustThis = function(msg) {
  alert(msg);
};

function tool(prefix) {
  return new Tool(prefix);
}

// Mix-in the methods from a static instance of Tool onto the 'tool' function.
// This makes both tool.alertThisPlus() and tool.alertJustThis() available,
// both will be called in the context of 'staticTool'.
(function() {
  var staticTool = new Tool();
  for (var o in staticTool) {
    if (typeof staticTool[o] == 'function') {
      tool[o] = staticTool[o].bind(staticTool);
    }
  }
})();

tool('hello').alertThisPlus('world'); // returns alert('hello world')
tool().alertJustThis('hello world');  // returns alert('hello world')
tool.alertJustThis('hello world');    // returns alert('hello world')
share|improve this answer
    
Note, Function.bind() isn't supported by all browsers yet so you may need to use a closure or write your own bind function. –  Dan Feb 3 '12 at 20:56
    
I understand everything but this part: (function() { var staticTool = new Tool(); for (var o in staticTool) { if (typeof staticTool[o] == 'function') { tool[o] = staticTool[o].bind(staticTool); } } })(); –  Fresheyeball Feb 3 '12 at 20:58
    
Can you explain what is going on there more? –  Fresheyeball Feb 3 '12 at 20:58
    
It creates a static instance of Tool and then copies each of the methods onto the tool function. If you did: tool[o] = staticTool[o] they would be called in the global context, by using bind you are binding the scope to staticTool. It's equivalent to: tool[o] = function() { staticTool[o].apply(staticTool, arguments); } –  Dan Feb 3 '12 at 21:01
    
Oh cool. That was the concept I was missing. –  Fresheyeball Feb 4 '12 at 0:04

The only way I can think of that would allow you to execute a function without parenthesis is if you are a) passing it as a callback param, or b) having it self execute.

var foo = (function() {
  alert('foo called');
})();

Taking that a step further, lets say you've use some closures to return values.

var foo = (function() {
  return {
    bar: "arf arf said the dog"
  }
})();

Now you can use:

foo.bar;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.