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I'm reading the red bean SVN book, and it says to layout trunk, branches, and tags folders like so:

$ svn list file:///var/svn/multi-project-repo
project-A/
project-B/
$ svn list file:///var/svn/multi-project-repo/project-A
trunk/
branches/
tags/
$ svn list file:///var/svn/multi-project-repo/project-B
trunk/
branches/
tags/
$

Now, that's all well and good, but what if I want to make a local working copy of just the trunk folders for project-A and project-B. If I update with the URL pointing to "multi-project-repo", I will additionally get the branches and tags folders that I don't need. Is what I'm asking unreasonable (getting only the trunk files) or am I being reasonable, and is there an easy way to do this?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Feb 3 '12 at 19:47

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
svn co http://mycompany.com/svn/Projects/Project1/trunk ./project1-trunk

That'll put a working copy of Project1/trunk in the local directory ./project1-trunk. There's nothing inherently special about any of the directories -- as far as SVN cares, they're just directories, and you can copy any one of them.

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Hmmm, I see so I can just create a script to do this for all of my project directories. Would this be acceptable? And by that I mean, instead of teaching my coworkers how to create an SVN checkout to just have them run a script? (actually, that might make things easier on everyone) –  sooprise Feb 3 '12 at 18:49
    
@sooprise : if you are on windows, check TortoiseSVN as well. –  Matthieu Feb 3 '12 at 18:51
    
Right, sorry for not mentioning this in the OP, but yes, we are using windows and tortoise. That being said, it still seems like a better idea just to write a script to do the initial checkout rather than manually checkingout each project's trunk. –  sooprise Feb 3 '12 at 18:53
5  
Teach your co-workers how to use SVN properly. Commits, check outs, merges, etc. are not that hard to learn, especially when using TortoiseSVN. –  Bernard Feb 3 '12 at 18:58
2  
What @Bernard said x10; also might want to look at IDE integration. VisualSVN is pretty awesome and generally worth it if you are using Visual Studio. Eclipse has good native integration. –  Wyatt Barnett Feb 3 '12 at 19:17

Use the URL to the repository directory you care about. If you want the "trunk" directory, check out that subdirectory, not the entire repository.

Keep reading!

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Right, but then my repository consists of many project folders, each project folder has its own trunk, branches, and tags folders. Now, if I'm a new employee and I want to create a working copy of all project trunk files, it seems quite laborious to have to manually checkout each project's trunk, but it seems I can write a script to do this for people who are just getting started. –  sooprise Feb 3 '12 at 18:52
1  
Or you can create a separate repository for each project if that makes it easier for you. –  Bernard Feb 3 '12 at 18:56
1  
There's an URL that corresponds to every one of those directories. Don't use the URL for the repository root, use the URL that specifies the directory you want to copy. –  Caleb Feb 3 '12 at 19:20

Another option (also in the svnbook) is to have one set of trunk, tags, and branches.

In the name of full disclosure, though, we'll mention another very common layout. In this layout, the trunk, tags, and branches directories live in the root directory of your repository, and your projects are in subdirectories beneath those, like so:

/
   trunk/
      calc/
      calendar/
      spreadsheet/
      …
   tags/
      calc/
      calendar/
      spreadsheet/
      …
   branches/
      calc/
      calendar/
      spreadsheet/
      …

This is another common layout, and might make more sense if the projects are more closely related or worked with together.

In this case, get the trunk, you get all of the projects. This is how we have our repository set up.

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this is how I prefer to work nowadays, branching just 'calc' does mean you have to branch everything... but it's cheap so it doesn't matter from a resource PoV. It does mean that you branch all common directories too which can be useful. This is probably the best approach to use if you have many related 'projects' in the same repository. –  gbjbaanb Feb 4 '12 at 1:12
    
Actually, you can just branch calc by itself as well (just copy calc to something in branches). A good naming scheme would be helpful (calc-123 vs. trunk-123). –  crashmstr Feb 6 '12 at 12:46

Assuming you are using mentioned layout and want to checkout all the trunks of all the projects with one command, consider the following technique:

  1. Create an additional project in SVN, e.g. call it all-trunks:

    svn mkdir file:///var/svn/multi-project-repo/all-trunks
    
  2. Make a working copy of all-trunks:

    svn co file:///var/svn/multi-project-repo/all-trunks
    
  3. Edit svn:externals property of the working copy of all-trunks to add all the project trunks you have:

    svn propedit svn:externals .
    ...
    ^/project-A/trunk project-A
    ^/project-B/trunk project-B
    ...
    
  4. Commit:

    svn ci
    

Now every time you want to get a working copy with trunks of all the projects you'll only need to checkout the all-trunks:

svn co file:///var/svn/multi-project-repo/all-trunks

Every time you create a new project don't forget to add it to svn:externals.

You can write a script that gets a list of all the projects svn ls file:///var/svn/multi-project-repo (excluding all-trunks) and builds a command to update svn:externals of all-trunks.

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