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The question I pose to myself (and now to the entire world, and perhaps beyond), is in my comment below:

[TestMethod()]
public void SetMessageTypeSubcodeTest()
{
    int AMessageTypeSubcode;
    // Should I put this class instantiation in MyTestInitialize?
    MessageClass target = new MessageClass(); 
. . .

Should I do this:

[TestInitialize()]
public void MyTestInitialize()
{
MessageClass target = new MessageClass(); 
}

...or this:

[ClassInitialize()]
public void MyTestInitialize()
{
MessageClass target = new MessageClass(); 
}

...or neither?

And since C#/.NET is garbage collected, there's no need to free MessageClass in the TestCleanup() or ClassCleanup() method, is there?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You want brand new instance of class you're testing for every single test in your set. This will prevent any possible side effects (which may happen), and as a result tests (which should be units, separated) influencing one another.

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So does this mean I should not put > 1 test in any single TestMethod()? If so, how can I run multiple tests against one method - by copying and pasting the TestMethod and giving them unique names, such as SetMessageTypeSubcodeTest2() and SetMessageTypeSubcodeTest3()? –  B. Clay Shannon Feb 3 '12 at 20:44
    
@ClayShannon: exactly. Unit test, by definition, is supposed to test single unit of software. Of course, this is not always possible, but it should be guideline to follow. If you have multiple possible scenarios (return values, throwing exceptions, different states) in single method, each of this scenario deserves one unit test on its own. Modern unit testing frameworks allow data driven testing, so verifying bulk of inputs/outputs for one method is not a big deal. –  jimmy_keen Feb 3 '12 at 20:47
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Unless construction of the class is expensive, do it every test. Guarantee you have a clean slate. You're right, you don't need to do any cleanup at test end either, unless the specific thing you're testing needs it (database connections closing, closing handshakes for web protocols, etc)

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1  
As a simple guideline...if whatever you set up has a Dispose or Close method, you should probably clean it up. –  cHao Feb 3 '12 at 20:35
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There is no real "right" answer to this question. Personally, given your code, I would not put that class instantiation into any kind of a setup method. I would keep that inside of each test, to make the test more readable and complete.

I believe that the right time to use a ClassInitialize or TestInitialize method is when you want to create a single consistent environment for all of the tests in that class to use. This is also why I don't like the "single test class per system class" approach. Each test class is a fixture that provides a consistent environment for its tests.

Over-aggressive refactoring of test code to move every "new Foo()" into the TestFixture will lead to wonderfully factored, but difficult to read unit tests. And for tests, I value readability over that level of factoring.

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