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I am Business Logic component to enable Customers can place online orders. So far my simplified business logic look like this:

  public class Product 
  {  
      public int productID { get; }  
      public string name { get; set; } 
      //other properties here like address and such
  } 


  public class Order
  {
     public int orderID { get; }
     public Customer customer { get; set; }

     public List<Product>  OrderItems  { get; set; }
     //other properties go here 

  }

List of Products will not support orders that contain products of multiple quantities. How do I add that support here? How would I call it from client side?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't use a List, use a Dictionary<Product,int>, where the int parameter is the quantity, or Dictionary<int,int>, where the first int is the product id and the second is the quantity.

You can always override .Equals for your Product class to be implemented in terms of your product id, so you're still using an int to define a product, but it may make things a bit simpler down the road (or if you ever need to change that).

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Thanks for reply. Dictionary always requires a key and that key has to be unique. What would be the key in this case? –  Victor Feb 3 '12 at 20:46
    
You should use the ProductID as the key (assuming that you want each product only one time in your order). It's an integer and therefore calculating the hash that is internally used for the Dictionary is pretty fast and you would also know if a product is already in part of your order. –  Jay Feb 3 '12 at 20:50
    
@Jay - ah, so it's Dictionary<ProductID, int>. Yes, Dictionary is much faster then list when it comes to searches, but doesn't it add complexity when you actually place an order, since client now needs to know Product ID for each item they select? –  Victor Feb 3 '12 at 21:04
    
Well, what Ed S. suggested was to use the Product object (an instance of product to be correct) as key (like you add instances of Product to your List<Product>). I assume that you already know the ID (Product.ProductID) of any product when adding it to an order. Otherwise you wouldn't have any idea what product is added. If you would add an product to you List<Product> you should also know the product ID (Product.ProductID), it's actually pretty much the same. The Dictionary would be Dictionary<int, int> if you use Product.ProductID as key. –  Jay Feb 3 '12 at 21:11
    
@Jay: I also added that you can simply override .Equals (and accompanying methods) in the product class to use the product id as well. This may be overengineering a bit, or it may be called for in this case. Hard to tell. –  Ed S. Feb 3 '12 at 22:09

Another approach would be to add a level of indirection with an OrderItem class:

public class Product
{
    public int productID { get; }
    public string name { get; set; }
}

public class OrderItem
{
    public Product product { get; set; }
    public int quantity { get; set; }
}

public class Order
{
    public int orderID { get; }
    public Customer customer { get; set; }

    public List<OrderItem> items { get; set; }
}

I.e. Order now refers to a list of OrderItems where each OrderItem has an associated quantity.

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I would add a third data object that contains order items that contains a link back to a product. The reason being is that you right now need quantity, but later I am going to guess you will want to give discounts on large where you might adjust the price per item down:

public class OrderLineItem
{
    Product p { get; set; }
    int Quantity {get; set;}
    Decimal PricePerItem {get; set;}
}
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You could make it something like

class OrderItem {
    public Product Product ..
    public int Qty ..
}

class Order {
    public List<OrderItem> Items ..
}
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You could structure it how you would envision a shopping cart to look. A single line would be a quantity of a certain product. Something like a ProductLine object which referenced a product and a quantity. Depending on how specific you logic is you may have additional attributes on a product such as manufacturer, SKU, etc. Sometimes you may get a comparable product from multiple manufacturers and for the sake of the order aren't interested but need to track that.

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Please clarify:

1) In Class Order did you mean to write:

public List<Product> OrderItems()  { get; set; }
//other properties go here 

2) Are you sure you are not missing an intermediate object:

public class OrderItem
{
   public int productID { get; }
   public int quantity { get; set; }
   // possibly other properties
}

In which case you would have:

public List<OrderItem> OrderItems()  { get; set; }

3) Are you trying to ensure that each OrderItem has a quantity of One? In other words you do not want to allow people to order more than one of each product? Or are you trying to make sure that someone doesn't add the same product twice to the OrderItems?

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thanks for reply. 1) Yes, I meant that, just a typo sorry 2) No, I am not sure and Ed's response adds to that. 3) No, I am not trying to ensure that, multiple quantities are allowed, hence my original question –  Victor Feb 3 '12 at 21:05
    
>>List of Products will not support orders that contain products of multiple quantities. How do I add that support here? << By that I thought you meant you wanted to implement "not supporting orders that contain products..." In which case I agree with Ed. Dictionary is a simple option for having multiple products while ensuring that any product only appears once in your list. –  BitFiddler Feb 3 '12 at 21:20

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