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is it possible to assign variable inside if conditional in bash 4? ie. in the function below I want to assign output of executing cmd to output and check whether it is an empty string - both inside test conditional. The function should output

"command returned: bar"

myfunc() {

local cmd="echo bar"
local output=

while [[ -z output=`$cmd` ]];
do
    #cmd is failing so far, wait and try again
    sleep 5
done

# great success
echo "command returned: $output"
}

why the above?

i prefer to run scripts with 'set -e' - which will cause script to terminate on first non-0 return/exit code that's not in an if/loop conditional.

with that in mind, imagine cmd is an unstable command that may exit with > 1 from time to time, and I want to keep calling it until it succeeds and i get some output.

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your code is equivalent to if [[ ! -z output=bar ]]. –  Karoly Horvath Feb 3 '12 at 21:22
    
Did you try it? Why do you want to do it in the first place? –  Carl Norum Feb 3 '12 at 21:24
    
the above is a trivial example - I will clarify –  Nikita Feb 3 '12 at 21:26
    
I just rewrote it to make it clear that that is not an assignment.. –  Karoly Horvath Feb 3 '12 at 21:29
    
@yi_H sorry, don't follow you - i do want to assign value to output and check whether it is an empty string - inside test conditional –  Nikita Feb 3 '12 at 21:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can try something like this:

myfunc() {

    local cmd="echo bar"
    local output=

    while ! output=$($cmd) || [[ -z output ]];
    do
        #cmd is failing so far, wait and try again
        sleep 5
    done

    # great success
    echo "command returned: $output"
}

Note that it is strongly recommended to avoid the use of set -e.

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long time no see –  SiegeX Feb 4 '12 at 3:30
    
thanks for the answer - works for me. Too bad about 'set -e' being unreliable - IMO achieving the goal behind set -e would be highly useful –  Nikita Feb 5 '12 at 16:07

I don't think you would be able to do it in your conditional

As yi_H pointed out, the if is equivalent to

if [[ ! -z output=bar ]];

which in turn is basically

if [[ ! -z "output=bar" ]];

So, all you are checking is if the string "output=bar" is empty or not...

So, output=bar could actually be anything like !@#!@%=== and it would still do the same thing (that is, the expression isn't evaluated). You might have to assign the variable in a subshell somehow, but I'm not sure that would work.

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Since assignment won't work there, you need some workaroudn.

You could temporary do a set +e...

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You could use this way ...

$cmd
exit_status=$?

while [[ $exit_status -gt 0 ]];
do
    #cmd is failing so far, wait and try again
    sleep 5

    $cmd
    exit_status=$?
done

EDIT: This won't work with 'set -e' or other way around, don't use 'set -e' to begin with.

share|improve this answer
    
if 'set -e' is used (see question), and $cmd returns != 0, bash will exit after the very first line –  Nikita Feb 7 '12 at 14:04
    
Agreed, and that is why this answer did not include it. 'set -e' causes confusion and forces to write scripts in not natural way. IMO, it is more of a trouble than it is worth. This small piece of code is the very example why it should be avoided. –  amit_g Feb 7 '12 at 17:15

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