Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm seeing some strange behavior when I run Rails server with rails s -e [env] (double ** added for emphasis):

~/app> rails s -e=**production**# << ok...v
=> Booting Mongrel              #         v huh?
=> Rails 3.1.1 application starting in **test** on http://0.0.0.0:3000
=> Call with -d to detach
=> Ctrl-C to shutdown server
^CExiting
~/app> rails s -e=**development**  
=> Booting Mongrel
=> Rails 3.1.1 application starting in **test** on http://0.0.0.0:3000
=> Call with -d to detach
=> Ctrl-C to shutdown server
^CExiting
~/app> RAILS_ENV=**development** rails s
=> Booting Mongrel
=> Rails 3.1.1 application starting in **development** on http://0.0.0.0:3000
=> Call with -d to detach
=> Ctrl-C to shutdown server
^CExiting
~/app> RAILS_ENV=**production** rails s
=> Booting Mongrel
=> Rails 3.1.1 application starting in **production** on http://0.0.0.0:3000
=> Call with -d to detach
=> Ctrl-C to shutdown server

The upshot is that the -e switch is being ignored.

The Rails guide doesn't mention any situations where it will be overriden. The command line help says -e Specifies the environment to run this server under test/development/production). OK.

I really think this was working fine a few weeks ago (been a while since I started a prod server on that box) so I may have changed something that broke this, but what? I checked for places where I was using = instead of == but didn't find any. Don't think that would explain this.

Update: John correctly points out that it is -e [env]. I tried that first with the same results then tried -e=[env]. The correct way (still produces incorrect result):

~/app> rails s -e production -p 5000
=> Booting Mongrel ^^^^^^^^^           vvvv
=> Rails 3.1.1 application starting in test on http://0.0.0.0:5000
=> Call with -d to detach
=> Ctrl-C to shutdown server
share|improve this question
1  
It's odd that running rails s on its own brings up the test environment, rather than development, as is the default behavior. You can try setting the RAILS_ENV environment variable, which is generally respected throughout rails, and see what happens: $ RAILS_ENV=production rails s –  Gabe Kopley Feb 3 '12 at 22:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Check that you don't have the RAILS_ENV environment variable set as it will override whatever you pass as a command line option.

The relevant bit of the rails source ydoes this

ENV["RAILS_ENV"] ||= options[:environment]

options is populated from the command line arguments, so if RAILS_ENV is already set your command line options have no effect.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, it looks like this is the answer. Didn't know that, thanks. I do have the RAILS_ENV set, to mimic production. –  jcollum Feb 4 '12 at 18:14

It's rails s -e <env>, not rails s -e=<env>. Notice the space between -e and the name of the environment:

#Ψ rails s -e production
#=> Booting WEBrick                     vvvvvvvvvv
#=> Rails 3.1.1 application starting in production on http://0.0.0.0:3000
                                        ^^^^^^^^^^
#Ψ rails s -e staging
#=> Booting WEBrick                     vvvvvvv
#=> Rails 3.1.1 application starting in staging on http://0.0.0.0:3000
                                        ^^^^^^^
share|improve this answer
    
I tried that too with the same result. Will update op. –  jcollum Feb 3 '12 at 21:23
    
Can you link to a repository that has your code in it? –  John Feminella Feb 3 '12 at 21:27
    
0_o all of it? This is behind IP protection so I can't share it. –  jcollum Feb 3 '12 at 21:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.