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I have a simple custom Point class as follows and I would like to know if my hashCode implemention could be improved or if this is the best it's going to get.

public class Point 
{
    private final int x, y;

    public Point(int x, int y)
    {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    public int getX() 
    {
        return x;
    }

    public int getY()
    {
        return y;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object other) 
    {
        if (this == other)
          return true;

        if (!(other instanceof Point))
          return false;

        Point otherPoint = (Point) other;
        return otherPoint.x == x && otherPoint.y == y;
    }


    @Override
    public int hashCode()
    {
        return (Integer.toString(x) + "," + Integer.toString(y)).hashCode();
    }

}
share|improve this question
1  
How are you trying to improve it? Do you want to try to make it faster? –  David Feb 3 '12 at 21:33
    
you want to guarantee uniqueness? speed? –  Adrian Feb 3 '12 at 21:33
    
I'd like to guarantee both :) –  Victor Parmar Feb 3 '12 at 22:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Please do not use Strings. There's a lot of theory behind this and several implementations (division method, multiplication one, etc...). If you have about a hour you can watch this MIT-Class

This being said, here is what Netbeans 7.1 suggests:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    int hash = 7;
    hash = 71 * hash + this.x;
    hash = 71 * hash + this.y;
    return hash;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Interesting that Netbeans suggests something different than eclipse, but the basis for the implementation is similar and solid. –  nybbler Feb 3 '12 at 22:10

The manual multiplication of values of all significant member fields as suggested by Gevorg is probably the most efficient and has a good value distribution. However, if you favour readability, there are nice alternatives available either in Java 7...

import java.util.Objects;

...

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return Objects.hash(x, y);
}

... or in the Guava library:

import com.google.common.base.Objects;

....

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return Objects.hashCode(x, y);
}

Both of these varags methods simply delegate to Arrays.hashCode(Object[] a), so there is a slight impact on performance because of the autoboxing of ints and creating an array of object references, but it should be far less significant than using reflection.

And the readability is just great, since you simply see, which fields are used for the hashcode computation and all the multiply and add syntax is just hidden under the hood of Arrays.hashCode(Object[] a):

public static int hashCode(Object a[]) {
    if (a == null)
        return 0;

    int result = 1;

    for (Object element : a)
        result = 31 * result + (element == null ? 0 : element.hashCode());

    return result;
}
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I would recommend using a simpler and more performant method without strings, perhaps Josh Bloch's method from this answer, in your case just:

return 37 * x + y;

EDIT: nybbler is correct. What is actually recommended is:

int result = 373; // Constant can vary, but should be prime
result = 37 * result + x;
result = 37 * result + y;
share|improve this answer
1  
That's not quite what's recommended in your linked answer. You missed that this should be done for every field individually, not at the same time. This algorithm generates the same result for [0,37] and [1,0] –  nybbler Feb 3 '12 at 22:07

From the JDK's Point class (inherited from Point2d):

public int hashCode() {
    long bits = java.lang.Double.doubleToLongBits(getX());
    bits ^= java.lang.Double.doubleToLongBits(getY()) * 31;
    return (((int) bits) ^ ((int) (bits >> 32)));
}

That looks slightly better than your implementation.

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You can have a look into existing Point type classes implementations:

/**
343      * Returns the hashcode for this <code>Point2D</code>.
344      * @return a hash code for this <code>Point2D</code>.
345      */
346     public int hashCode() {
347     long bits = java.lang.Double.doubleToLongBits(getX());
348     bits ^= java.lang.Double.doubleToLongBits(getY()) * 31;
349     return (((int) bits) ^ ((int) (bits >> 32)));
350     }

from: http://kickjava.com/src/java/awt/geom/Point2D.java.htm#ixzz1lMCZCCZw

Simple guide for hashCode implementation can be found here

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I used to write my own hash and equals functions then I found this : )

import org.apache.commons.lang.builder.HashCodeBuilder;
import org.apache.commons.lang.builder.EqualsBuilder;

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
   return EqualsBuilder.reflectionEquals(this, obj);
 }
@Override
public int hashCode() {
   return HashCodeBuilder.reflectionHashCode(this);
 }

of course keep in mind the following:

Because reflection involves types that are dynamically resolved, certain Java virtual machine optimizations can not be performed. Consequently, reflective operations have slower performance than their non-reflective counterparts, and should be avoided in sections of code which are called frequently in performance-sensitive applications. SRC

share|improve this answer
    
Since there are only two fields, you could also use this library, but explicitly list the fields. –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 3 '12 at 21:34
    
If this class is used significantly in a Collection, a reflective hashCode will be a big performance hit. –  user949300 Feb 3 '12 at 21:38
1  
I'd recommend using the HashCodeBuilder.append method instead. –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 3 '12 at 22:25

By default, Eclipse will use a hashCode() function for your Point class similar to:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    result = prime * result + getOuterType().hashCode();
    result = prime * result + x;
    result = prime * result + y;
    return result;
}

At the very least, incorporating a prime number into your hashCode algorithm will help with it's "uniqueness".

share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps you miswrote "Java" instead of "Eclipse". By default, hashCode "is typically implemented by converting the internal address of the object into an integer." –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 3 '12 at 22:24
    
@MatthewFlaschen Indeed I did. Updated now; thanks for catching that. –  nybbler Feb 4 '12 at 0:11

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