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I am fairly new to unit testing in C# and learning to use Moq. Below is the class that I am trying to test.

class MyClass
{
    SomeClass someClass;
    public MyClass(SomeClass someClass)
    {
        this.someClass = someClass;     
    }

    public void MyMethod(string method)
    {
        method = "test"
        someClass.DoSomething(method);
    }   
}

class Someclass
{
    public DoSomething(string method)
    {
        // do something...
    }
}

Below is my TestClass:

class MyClassTest
{
    [TestMethod()]
    public void MyMethodTest()
    {
        string action="test";
        Mock<SomeClass> mockSomeClass = new Mock<SomeClass>();
        mockSomeClass.SetUp(a => a.DoSomething(action));
        MyClass myClass = new MyClass(mockSomeClass.Object);
        myClass.MyMethod(action);
        mockSomeClass.Verify(v => v.DoSomething(It.IsAny<string>()));
    }
}

I get the following exception:

Expected invocation on the mock at least once, but was never performed
No setups configured.
No invocations performed..

I just want to verify if the method "MyMethod" is being called or not. Am I missing something?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
That won't compile if SomeClass doesn't have a definition for MyMethod(string), which it looks like it doesn't. –  Platinum Azure Feb 3 '12 at 23:08
    
sorry..I edited my question.. –  user591410 Feb 3 '12 at 23:17
1  
You're on the right track, but there are bugs in the posted code. It won't compile - casing on Someclass, void return on DoSomething. After that you need public access, then make DoSomething virtual. In short you probably have a bug in your production code too. –  TrueWill Feb 4 '12 at 1:37
    
Thanks for your response. I was setting the arguments wrong while setting up the mock method.. –  user591410 Feb 4 '12 at 17:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You're checking the wrong method. Moq requires that you Setup (and then optionally Verify) the method in the dependency class.

You should be doing something more like this:

class MyClassTest
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void MyMethodTest()
    {
        string action = "test";
        Mock<SomeClass> mockSomeClass = new Mock<SomeClass>();

        mockSomeClass.Setup(mock => mock.DoSomething());

        MyClass myClass = new MyClass(mockSomeClass.Object);
        myClass.MyMethod(action);

        // Explicitly verify each expectation...
        mockSomeClass.Verify(mock => mock.DoSomething(), Times.Once());

        // ...or verify everything.
        // mockSomeClass.VerifyAll();
    }
}

In other words, you are verifying that calling MyClass#MyMethod, your class will definitely call SomeClass#DoSomething once in that process. Note that you don't need the Times argument; I was just demonstrating its value.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I edited my question with the right method. As you mentioned, I tried SetUp first and then performed Verify. It still gives me the same exception. –  user591410 Feb 3 '12 at 23:23
    
I updated my question with the suggestions that you made, but even this gives me the same exception.. Please advise. –  user591410 Feb 3 '12 at 23:31
    
Got it.. Thanks.. I was setting the arguments of the method wrong while setting it up. –  user591410 Feb 4 '12 at 17:43
1  
Isn't it redundant to setup an expectation, then explicitly verify the same expectation? Wouldn't mockSomeClass.VerifyAll(); achieve the same result and be more DRY? –  Tim Long Feb 4 '12 at 19:04
5  
Yes it would but some people favor being explicit. –  Platinum Azure Feb 4 '12 at 19:53

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