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I understand breadth-first, but am having issues as I am dealing with a one-to-many children relationship.

My object model is Parent -> Children (Many)

With the code I have now, I am just writing to a file with a string builder, but in the future I will be using Excel automation.

The exact problem is maintaining tabbing such that the children display properly. Each child may also have children.

{
        Queue<UserStory> storiesQueue = new Queue<UserStory>();
        StringBuilder printDocument = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (var userStorey in _rallyDownloader.GetUserStories().OrderBy(story => story.Name))
        {
            storiesQueue.Enqueue(userStorey);
        }
        int tabs = 0;
        while (storiesQueue.Count > 0)
        {
            string tab = "";
            for (int i = 0; i < tabs; i++)
            {
                tab += "|----";
            }
            var story = storiesQueue.Dequeue();

            printDocument.Append(tab + story.Name + "\n");

            tabs++;
            foreach (var child in story.Children)
            {
                string cTab = "";
                for (int i = 0; i < tabs; i++)
                {
                    cTab += "|----";
                }
                printDocument.Append(cTab + child.Name + "\n");

                foreach (var storey in child.Children)
                {
                    storiesQueue.Enqueue(storey);
                }


            }
        }
    }

I attempted to keep the count of the original roots, and tabbing when reaching the end but there may be an easier way.

I avoid recursion as I am dealing with a large data set and was experiencing memory issues.

I ended up using the stack idea and created this code.

StreamWriter stream = new StreamWriter(@"C:\awesomeSaucer.txt", true);
        Stack<UserStory> storiesQueue = new Stack<UserStory>();
        Stack<string> indentation = new Stack<string>();

        foreach (var userStorey in _rallyDownloader.GetUserStories().OrderBy(story => story.Name))
        {
            storiesQueue.Push(userStorey);
            indentation.Push("");
        }

        while (storiesQueue.Count > 0)
        {
            string tab = indentation.Pop();
            var story = storiesQueue.Pop();

            stream.WriteLine(tab + story.Name + "\n");

            // printDocument.Append(tab + story.Name + "\n");

            foreach (var child in story.Children)
            {
                indentation.Push(tab + "----");
                storiesQueue.Push(child);
            }
        }
        stream.Close();
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2  
This is not a solution to your specific problem, but it might inspire a solution; here I challenged people to solve this problem using depth-first search, and I got several dozen interesting solutions: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/09/… My personal solution is here: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/09/09/… –  Eric Lippert Feb 3 '12 at 23:25
    
Thanks, I'll check that out. –  tylerjgarland Feb 3 '12 at 23:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would use a stack which reflects the actual depth of your traversal by its size, when traversed elements were pushed and popped according to the current branch. This would also allow you to continue your traversal without enqueuing children. This way, your tab count would be stack.Count() - 1 assuming the root node has 0 tabs. The basic idea is, if you want to avoid a thread stack overflow caused by recursion, you can roll your own stack on the heap.

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