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How would I only return one dimension of an array, while ignoring the other?

Such as:

int map[4][8];

int MapManager::getMapX(int x)
{
    return map[x];
}
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Are you asking how to implement getRow and getCol? :) – Vyktor Feb 3 '12 at 23:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since none of the other answers here return an actual array (pointers are not arrays), I thought I might show how to really return an array. Or the closest thing possible, which is a reference to an array.

typedef int row_type[8];

row_type& MapManager::getMapX(int x) {
    return map[x];
}

What's the point of this? The pointer works the same!

No, it doesn't. The pointer loses type information, namely, the size. You can make begin() and end() functions work with arrays, but you can't with pointers:

// pointer version
int* MapManager::getMapX_ptr(int x) {
    return map[x];
}

row_type& row = getMapX(0);
// row is of type int(&)[8]
// notice the size is not lost in the type!
std::sort(begin(row), end(row));
// compiles fine! end() correctly finds the end of the row

int* ptr = getMapX_ptr(0);
// notice how ptr has no size information at all
std::sort(begin(ptr), end(ptr));
// can't possible be made to work!

You can't write end for int*.

template <typename T, std::size_t N>
T* end(T(&arr)[N]) {
    return &arr[0] + N;
}

template <typename T>
T* end(T* ptr) {
    // what here?
    // guess?
    // pick a random number?
}
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The return type should be int* or int[], not int:

int* MapManager::getMapX(int x) {
    return map[x];
}

Other than that, you are fine.

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With a 2 dimensional array you will only be able to directly return a one dimensional array for the inner array by converting to a pointer, such as

int map[4][8];

int* MapManager::getMapX(int x)
{
    return map[x];
}

For the other 'dimension', you will need to have another external array to copy to:

int* MapManager::getMapY(int y, int *outArray, int numElements)
{
   for(int i = 0; i < numElements; i++) {
      outArray[i] = map[i][y];
   }
}

This array needs to be allocated with the correct size. (8 in this case).

The reason for this is that the array elements for the y 'column' are not contiguous in memory, but spread across several arrays (which are the 'x' rows). C arrays rely on this contiguous concept for accessing the elements.

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You could create a special class that provides a strided view of an array. That is to say, it skips over values. Here's the beginnings of something like that:

template<typename T>
class StridedView
{
public:
    StridedView(T * b, int stride, int count)
        :begin_(b), stride_(stride), count_(count)
    {}

    template<int N>
    StridedView(T (&arr)[N])
        :begin_(arr), stride_(1), count_(N)
    {}

    T & operator[](int index)
    {
        return *(begin_ + index * stride_);
    }

    const T & operator[](int index) const
    {
        return *(begin_ + index * stride_);
    }

    int size() const { return count_; }
private:
    T * begin_;
    int stride_;
    int count_;
};

Then you could have functions that can get you a row or a column as appropriate:

template<typename T, int R, int C>
StridedView<T> GetRow(T (&arr)[R][C], int row)
{
    T * begin = (*arr) + (row * C);
    return StridedView<T>(begin, 1, C);
}

template<typename T, int R, int C>
StridedView<T> GetColumn(T (&arr)[R][C], int column)
{
    T * begin = (*arr) + column;
    return StridedView<T>(begin, C, R);
}

Demo

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