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so I have subclassed a UIViewController that I create. The question is, is there a way so that I can force to call a method using the subclassed one if the one I am creating is the super class. I know this is stupid, as it's the same as forcing a mammal to call a dog's behavior. But before doing this, I am actually making sure first that that mammal is a dog, otherwise I won't call it. Is this a bad thing to do? If not then how can I do such thing? I tried casting the superclass into it's subclass and then do a method call, but it doesn't work. Any thoughts?

So what I am trying to do. I have a UIViewController A and a subclass of that B. If I have A and I want to call B's method that overrides A, how do I do that? I hope this is clear

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I'm not quite sure I understand what you mean. Could you post your code so I can see what you're trying to do? –  Simon Germain Feb 4 '12 at 0:04
    
added a one line sentence desrcibing what I meant –  xonegirlz Feb 4 '12 at 0:08
    
The whole point of subclassing is to override methods of superclass or add new methods. So you would create an instance of the subclass and call that method. Why would you cast the superclass to subclass? –  mbh Feb 4 '12 at 0:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is a difference between how you declare your object and what it actually is. Consider this example:

Mammal *mammal = [[Dog alloc] init]; //Dog is a subclass of Mammal

Here, you have a pointer to a Mammal object which actually points to an instance of the specialized Dog class. This is valid because a mammal has all the methods that a dog has.

You can check if some Mammal instance is actually a Dog by using isKindOfClass:, like this:

if ([mammal isKindOfClass:[Dog class]]) {
    [(Dog *)mammal bark];
}

This is perfectly valid. If however you would have created your mammal with [[Mammal alloc] init], the check for the Dog class would fail and you would not be able to call any methods that only Dog has. If you wouldn't do the check, this would actually crash, because the casting does not change the object in any way, it just tells the compiler "I know what I'm doing, don't warn me".

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I believe you can only go up the hierarchy, not down. So, basically, you can call a superclass from your class, but not a subclass. There's no relation there, unless you initialize your subclass by passing a reference of itself to it's superclass.

Is that kinda what you're looking for?

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hmm.. I initialize it as it's superclass –  xonegirlz Feb 4 '12 at 0:15
    
I'm not sure I know what this means. Superclasses are never aware of their subclasses. –  Simon Germain Feb 4 '12 at 0:16

I have a UIViewController A and a subclass of that B. If I have A and I want to call B's method that overrides A, how do I do that?

You just call the method. If the object is, in fact, an instance of B, then B's version of that method will be executed. If the object was instantiated as an instance of A, then A's version of the method will be called. Try it out for yourself to really understand it:

@interface A : NSObject
{}
@end

@implementation A
- (void)whoAmI
{
    NSLog(@"I'm an A\n);
}
@end

@interface B : A
@end

@implementation B
- (void)whoAmI
{
    NSLog(@"I'm a B\n");
}
@end

//...
A *a = [[A alloc] init];
A *b = [[B alloc] init];
B *c = [[A alloc] init];
B *d = [[B alloc] init];

[a whoAmI];    // this will log "I'm an A"
[b whoAmI];    // this will log "I'm a B"
[c whoAmI];    // this will log "I'm an A"
[d whoAmI];    // this will log "I'm a B"

In the implementation of a subclass, you can call a method of the superclass by using the super keyword instead of self. For example, another method of B could call B's -whoAmI like this:

[self whoAmI];

or it could call it's superclass' implementation like this:

[super whoAmI];

This is mostly useful in overrides of the same method, so that you can preserve the inherited behavior but add on to it. B's -whoAmI could be implemented like this:

- (void)whoAmI
{
    NSLog(@"I'm a B\n");
    [super whoAmI];
}

In that case, the snippet above would have the results shown in comments:

[a whoAmI];    // this will log "I'm an A"
[b whoAmI];    // this will log "I'm a B" followed by "I'm an A"
[c whoAmI];    // this will log "I'm an A"
[d whoAmI];    // this will log "I'm a B" followed by "I'm an A"

It's important to really understand this stuff as it's fundamental to understanding how to work with objects of different types. So take some time to write silly little sample programs like this, and keep asking questions until you're sure you've got it.

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