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I want my object to be able to type in an double or a string such as getting an input for salary. I have my code working with a property that allows for a double only. I know that property overloading isn't supported from the other postings at this site. I also know that setters are going to allow me to get an string input for salary. I don't understand how to overload. I have some of the template code here:

private double salary = 20000;

public Employee()
{
}

public Employee(double sal)
{
    salary = sal;
}

public double Salary
{
    get { return salary; }
    set { salary = value; }
}

public void SetSalary(string sal)
{
    salary = Convert.ToString(sal);       
}

Error code:

can not implicitly covert type string to double

I want to be able to have an object be able to overload salary using a setter in C#. I am a student and understand most of the basics. Thanks ahead of time for any help.

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2  
You want your last line to be Salary = Convert.ToDouble(sal). Not ToString. –  AaronS Feb 4 '12 at 1:17
    
Why don't callers just do Employee.Salary = someDouble. Otherwise, as salary is a double you need to use Convert.ToDouble. You can always do Employee.Salary = Convert.ToDouble(salaryAsString) too. –  dash Feb 4 '12 at 1:17
    
Nice idea about converting with the callers. –  bad boy Feb 4 '12 at 1:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
public void SetSalary(string sal) 
{ 
    salary = Convert.ToString(sal);        
} 

You are converting the parameter, which is already a string, to a string, and trying to assign it to a field that is of type double.

salary = Convert.ToDouble(sal); // one way
salary = double.Parse(sal); // another way 

Note that these conversions can fail if the string is not in the proper numeric format. double.TryParse could be useful, but it's probably an exception that needs to propogated to your callers when they send an invalid input. With all of that said, I would leave it up to your callers to convert the value to the appropriate type and simply expose the double property. There's no need to complicate matters in your class.

For that matter, for a value that is supposed to represent a salary, you should consider using the more appropriate decimal type. It's tailored for storing financial values.

 decimal salary; 
 // elsewhere
 salary = Convert.ToDecimal(sal);
 salary = decimal.Parse(sal);
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That's great advice. –  bad boy Feb 4 '12 at 1:22
    
+1. @bad boy, If you are doing it for real usage don't forget about Culture and different numeric formats. Depending on your environment number format that your code runs with may not be the same as the format user used to input data in. If salary incorrectly converted from 1,000 (thousand with comma as digit separator) to 1 you may have some unhappy customers. –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 4 '12 at 1:30

This will get rid of the error you are describing:

public void SetSalary(string sal)
{
    salary = Convert.ToDouble(sal);
}
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Excellent and quick response. –  bad boy Feb 4 '12 at 1:23

The offending line is

salary = Convert.ToString(sal);

This says: set the salary private field to be whatever the string representation of sal is. But the salary private field is actually a double! You probably want something like

public void SetSalary(string sal)
{
    salary = double.Parse(sal);       
}

Or, if you don't like to use exceptions for errors, use double.TryParse instead.

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salary = Convert.ToString(sal);   

You are converting the string sal again to string by ToString? And then you are trying to assign it to a double salary.

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// Note that this has been shortened.  The compiler will take care of making a backing field for us; we don't need to worry about it.
public double Salary { get; set; }

public Employee()
{
    // Only set the default value for Salary in the parameterless constructor.
    Salary = 20000.0;
}

public Employee(double salary)
{
    // Notice how the parameter names are more verbose.
    Salary = salary;
}

public void SetSalary(string value)
{
    double salary;
    // TryParse allows us to handle errors manually, rather than dealing with (slow) exceptions.
    if (double.TryParse(value, out salary))
    {
        Salary = salary;
    }
    else
    {
        // We should really do something other than just throw an exception here, but that's what I'm doing for example purposes.
        throw new ArgumentException("Argument must be parsable as a double.", "value");
    }
}
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