Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am making a text based game, but I am having a rather large problem. This problem is that when I assign a new ActionListener to a button that already has an ActionListener assigned to it, it does both of the actions. Here's my code:

       while(shouldLoop) {
       if(Player.loc == 1) {
       left.setText("Do nothing");
       left.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
           @Override
           public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
           nar1.setText("You are still in a dungeon."); //Here's my first assignment
       }
       });
       right.setText("Pick the lock");
       right.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
           @Override
           public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
               Player.loc = 2;
           }
       });
       } if(Player.loc == 2) {
               nar1.setText("You are now outside");
               nar2.setText("the door. What now?");
               forward.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
                   @Override
                   public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                       nar1.setText("You hear a guard.");
                       nar2.setText("What do you do now?");
                       Player.loc = 3;
       }
               });
               left.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {   //Here's another
                   @Override                                   //assignment to
                   public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {//the same button
                       nar1.setText("You hear a guard.");      //so when I press
                       nar2.setText("What do you do now?");    //it here, it
                       Player.loc = 3;                         //performs the
                   }                                           //original assignment
               });
               right.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
                   @Override
                   public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                       nar1.setText("You hear a guard.");
                       nar2.setText("What do you do now?");
                       Player.loc = 3;
                   }
               });
               right.setText(rgt);
               forward.setText(fwd);
               back.setText(bck);
               left.setText(lft);
               forward.setVisible(true);
       } if(Player.loc == 3) {
           forward.setVisible(false);
           right.setText("Sneak around him!");
           left.setText("Fight him!");
       }

Thanks for helping,

billofbong

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Why don't you just hoist the addActionListener code out of the while loop?

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, nevermind. I can't do that because I need to have it there. This is because when the user presses a button, it needs to evaluate the if statements, which add more ActionListener s. If that makes sense. –  billofbong Feb 4 '12 at 1:32
    
It doesn't really make much sense. Why do you need to add more action listeners for the buttons? –  Amir Afghani Feb 4 '12 at 1:35
    
Because I need to change the function of the button for every time the user advances a location (notice Player.loc = 2). –  billofbong Feb 4 '12 at 1:46
    
So call getActionListeners in a loop and remove them. Or don't declare them using an anonymous inner class and remove them. –  Amir Afghani Feb 4 '12 at 2:03
    
Ah, thanks! That works... –  billofbong Feb 4 '12 at 3:43

Anonymous inner class listeners look nice in quick and dirty example code, but, in practice, they are a horrible idea. You are learning one of the reasons. Other reasons are that they can't readily be subclassed or modified via Dependency Injection types of things, can't readily be shared (say a button, a toolbar icon, and a menu do the same thing), can't readily be enabled / disabled, (say, "Save As" should be disabled cause nothing is open) etc...

For this use case, break them out into some series of actual Listeners, perhaps organized in a class, array, or some Enums, so they can get swapped in and out.

share|improve this answer

You are mixing data with code in a bad way by hard-coding the logic of your program in the program itself, and this is the main source of your current and future problems. This won't work, at least not without a lot of kludges.

I suggest you try to separate your data out of your code and make your program more MVC-ish, which stands Model-View-Controller (or one of its many variants). For instance the logic of the program is held by the Model and this includes the non-visualized map of the land being explored, the position of the player in this map, his companions, and your inventory of items that you've collected. So you will likely have several non-GUI classes such as Player, Map, Item (this may be an interface), Room, etc... The Map itself, the possible items, there locations, will be specified in a data file, perhaps a text file for a simple program or a database for a more complex one, and you will need classes to read and parse this file(s).

The View of your program is your GUI, and it should be as dumb as possible. Here is where you'll have your buttons, your text display, and if fancy, a graphical display of your game. No program logic goes in here. None.

The Control will be the Action Listeners that you add to your JButtons and any other code that has to deal with handling user input. But this code could be relatively simple, and it's main task is to pass user interactions to the model. So for instance if the left button is pressed, it may be simply something like

model.leftButtonPress();

Then the model will decide what to do with a left button press, if anything. The model will know where you are in the game for instance, if there's a door to your left or if it's a wall, and based on the state of the model your game will perform the requisite action.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.