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Currently I have a client/server implementation of C code. I have done a lot to follow different books and implementations, and ultimately it doesn't work.

Referencing the "printf" statements below, I can say that the client succeeds in sending the message, but the server never passes the receive stage (even after the client has supposedly succeeded in sending).

So ultimately I get the impression that there is something either with the way my server is receiving the code OR something to do with the formatting what I am sending (when I say this I mean that I am possibly missing \0 or \r\n or something though I believe I am including them quite anally).

Here is the relevant code with much removed:

SERVER:

int Server::update(char *getbuf)
{

...

// ACCEPT
        clientsocket = accept(serversocket, (struct sockaddr *)&client_address, &alen);
if(!clientsocket)
            logger.fail("Accept Fail");
else
logger.info("Accept succeed");


    z = recv (clientsocket, sbuf, sSize, MSG_DONTWAIT);


    snprintf(&sbuf[z], sSize-z, "\r\n\0");


    snprintf(getbuf, sSize, sbuf);


    logger.data("Received: %s",sbuf);       

        respond(getbuf);

        return TRUE;
    }

returnFALSE;
}


void Server::respond(char *response)
{
// SEND
ssize_t z;
    int sSize = 64;
    char sbuf[sSize];


    snprintf(sbuf, sSize, response);
    snprintf(&sbuf[z], sSize-z, "\r\n\0");


    z = send(clientsocket, sbuf, sSize, 0);
    if (z < 0)
fprintf(stderr,"send failure\n");
    else
logger.info("Send Succeed");
}

CLIENT

Code:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
...

    z = connect(com_socket, (struct sockaddr *) &server_address, sizeof(server_address));
    if(z == -1)
    {
        if(errno == EINPROGRESS)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "EINPROGRESS non block start\n");
        }

        if(errno == EALREADY)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "EALREADY non block subsequent request\n");
        }

        fprintf(stderr, "Connect failed\n");
    }
    else 
    printf("Connect Success\n");


    int sSize = 64;
    char sbuf[sSize];


    z = snprintf(sbuf, sSize, command);
        snprintf(&sbuf[z], sSize-z, "\r\n\0");


// SEND
    z = send(com_socket, sbuf, sSize, 0);
    if (z < 0)
        fprintf(stderr,"send failure\n");
    else
    printf("Send Succeeded\n");

// READ
    z = recv(com_socket, sbuf, sSize, MSG_DONTWAIT);
    if (z < 0)
        fprintf(stderr,"receive failure\n");
    else
    printf("Receive Succeeded\n");

    snprintf(&sbuf[z], sSize-z,"\r\n\0");


// Output
    printf("Received Response: %s\n", sbuf);

    close(com_socket);

    exit(1);
}
share|improve this question
2  
Vague question, giant pile of code. No. – John Zwinck Feb 4 '12 at 1:27
3  
Nathan - in your server code, you are passing MSG_DONTWAIT to the recv call, but you are not checking the return value (z). Which means if the sent data is not immediately available, then "-1" will get returned and assigned to z. And that will do bad things with the pointer math you do in subsequent snprintf calls. That's the first bug I see. I suspect I can find several more..... – selbie Feb 4 '12 at 1:35
1  
@Jefromi - agree and disagree. Agree that his question didn't show much attempt to solve the issue by himself. (e.g. He's basically saying, "Hey, please debug my program for me!"). Disagree that he didn't do enough to state the problem or post enough to generate a valid answer. In any case, I have an idea that I'll bring up on meta. – selbie Feb 4 '12 at 3:14
1  
@Jefromi - IMHO, his question was very clear. He just didn't ask it in a very reasonable manner. I interpreted it as, "Here's my socket code. The server code is working fine, but the client doesn't seem to get or print a resaponse." I suspect if he actually phrased it that way, had a better title (e.g. "recv not returning expected data"), trimmed his code down to a more minimal example, and showed some evidence he debugged it, it probably wouldn't get voted down. I've seen a whole lost worse allowed - I'm not convinced the close rules are applied equally throughout SO. My 2cents. – selbie Feb 4 '12 at 3:51
1  
Nathan - I do partially agree with Jefromi that your question was not the most appropriate style of posting. (Although, I'm happy to answer away at almost anything...). In the future, you should show some evidence that you actually tried to debug the issue yourself. As it stands now, it looks like you copied and pasted a bunch of socket code that you didn't understand yourself and are subsequently asking for help debugging. (Your question title implies frustration instead of a real question.) See my comment above on how your question could have been better formed. – selbie Feb 4 '12 at 4:00

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