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I have

var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p=`echo -e $p'\n'$i`
done
echo $p

I want last echo to print

a
b
c

Notice that I want the variable p to contain newlines. How do I do that?

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Did you try \\n? –  Hubro Feb 4 '12 at 8:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I have completed my answer thanks to @GordonDavisson, @Dolda2000 and @tripleee.
=> +1 for all three ;-)

Inserting \n

echo -e interprets the two characters \n as a new line.

var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p="$p\n$i"  #echo is not required
done
echo -e "$p"   #do not forget -e here

Inserting a new line in the source code

var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p="$p
$i"       #the new line is done in the source code
done
echo "$p" #double quotes required, but -e not required

Using $'\n' (less portable)

bash interprets $'\n' as a new line.

var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p="$p"$'\n'"$i"  
done
echo "$p" #double quotes required, but -e not required

Output is the same for all

a
b
c
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1  
This doesn't actually embed newlines, it embeds \n, which the echo -e converts to newlines as it prints. Depending on your actual goal, this may or may not do the trick. –  Gordon Davisson Feb 4 '12 at 17:52
    
Thank you very much @GordonDavisson. You are right! I have then updated my answer to insert a real new lines. To thank you I have upvoted a very good answer from you. Cheers. See you ;-) –  olibre Feb 4 '12 at 20:49
    
You've got a missing double quote; the third last code line should be p="$p"$'\n'"$i" –  l0b0 Feb 6 '12 at 14:37
    
Yep @l0b0, you have very good eagle eyes ;-) Next time I will help you to improve your answer :-D Thanks –  olibre Feb 6 '12 at 21:14

The trivial solution is to put those newlines where you want them.

var="a
b
c"

Yes, that's an assignment wrapped over multiple lines.

However, you will need to double-quote the value when interpolating it, otherwise the shell will split it on whitespace, effectively turning each newline into a single space (and also expand any wildcards).

echo "$p"

Generally, you should double-quote all variable interpolations unless you specifically desire the behavior described above.

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+1 for your contribution, I have completed my answer thanks to you ;-) –  olibre Feb 4 '12 at 20:46

Try echo $'a\nb'.

If you want to store it in a variable and then use it with the newlines intact, you will have to quote your usage correctly:

var=$'a\nb\nc'
echo "$var"

Or, to fix your example program literally:

var="a b c"
for i in $var; do
    p="`echo -e "$p\\n$i"`"
done
echo "$p"
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The $'variable' syntax is very convenient, but I don't believe it is portable to other shells. –  tripleee Feb 4 '12 at 10:33
    
@Dolda2000 Why do we have to escape \n ? –  abc Feb 4 '12 at 16:27
    
+1 for your contribution, I have completed my answer thanks to you ;-) –  olibre Feb 4 '12 at 20:46
    
@abc: That depends on which escape you mean. If you mean the final, echo "$p", it's because the shell would otherwise interpret the newlines as simple parameter separators, pass a, b and c to echo as three different parameters, and echo would then join them with spaces. When you quote $p, its exact contents are passed intact as one single parameter. –  Dolda2000 Feb 5 '12 at 3:10
var="a b c"
for i in $var
do
   p=`echo -e "$p"'\n'$i`
done
echo "$p"

The solution was simply to protect the inserted newline with a "" during current iteration when variable substitution happens.

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sed solution:

echo "a b c" | sed 's/ \+/\n/g'

Result:

a
b
c
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