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I need some help with operators new and delete

I tried to create a class named big to handle huge numbers

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class big
{
protected:
    char *a;
    long lenght,maxlenght;
public:
    big()
    {
        maxlenght=256;
        a=new char[maxlenght];
        memset(a,'\0',maxlenght);
    }
    void read();

    void set_maxlenght(long x);

    long msize();

    long size();

    char* return_big();

    long at(long poz);

    char* operator[](long poz);

    void operator=(big x);

    void modify (long poz,long val);

    void dec (long poz);

    void inc (long poz);

    void operator-(big x);

    int compare(big x);
};




//functions

void write(big x)
{
    char *ptr;
    ptr=x.return_big();
    cout<<ptr;
}


//class big

    void big::read()
    {
        char *buffer;
        buffer=new char[maxlenght];
        memset(buffer,'\0',maxlenght);
        cin>>buffer;
        delete[] a;
        a=new char[strlen(buffer)];
        memset(a,'\0',maxlenght);
        for(long i=0;i<(long)strlen(buffer);i++)
            a[i]=buffer[i];
        lenght=strlen(buffer);
        delete[] buffer;
    }

    void big::set_maxlenght(long x)
    {
        maxlenght=x;
    }

    long big::msize()
    {
        return maxlenght;
    }

    long big::size()
    {
        return lenght;
    }

    char* big::return_big()
    {
        char *x;
        x=a;
        return x;
    }

    long big::at(long poz)
    {
        if(poz>=lenght)
            return -1;
        else
            return this->a[poz];
    }

    char* big::operator[](long poz)
    {
        if(poz>=lenght)
            return NULL;
        else
            return a+poz;
    }

    void big::operator=(big x)
    {
        a=new char[x.size()];
        for(long i=0;i<(long)strlen(x.a);i++)
            this->modify(i,x.at(i));
        this->lenght=strlen(x.a);
    }

    void big::modify (long poz,long val)
    {
        a[poz]=(char)val;
    }

    void big::dec (long poz)
    {
        if(a[poz])
            a[poz]--;
    }

    void big::inc (long poz)
    {
        if(a[poz]<255)
            a[poz]++;
    }

    void big::operator-(big z)
    {
        long n,m,i,j,aux;
        big rez,x,y;
        if(compare(z))
        {
            x=*this;
            y=z;
        }
        else
        {
            y=*this;
            x=z;
        }
        n=x.size();
        m=y.size();
        i=n;
        j=m;
        while(j>=0)
        {
            if(x.at(i)<0)
            {
                x.modify(i-1,x.at(i-1)+x.at(i));
                x.modify(i,0);
            }
            aux=x.at(i)-y.at(j);
            if(aux<0)
            {
                x.dec(i-1);
                rez.modify(i,aux+10);
            }
            else
                rez.modify(i,aux);
        }
        while(i)
        {
            i--;
            if(x.at(i)<0)
            {
                x.modify(i-1,x.at(i-1)+x.at(i));
                x.modify(i,0);
            }
            rez.modify(i,x.at(i));
        }
    }

    int big::compare(big x)
    {
        return strcmp(this->a,x.return_big());
    }

    int main()
    {
        big a,b;
        a.read();
        b.read();
        write(a);
        endl(cout);
        write(b);
        return 0;
    }

The first read is ok but the second has this error when it want to execute a=new char[strlen(buffer)]:

---Windows has triggered an error in MyProject.exe

This may be due to the corruption of the heap, which indicates a bug in MyProject.exe or any DLLs it has loaded.
This may also be due to the user pressing F12 while MyProject.exe has focus.
The output window may have more diagnostic information.---

There are also two buttons Break and Continue.
If I press continue it shows me this:

Unhandled exception at 0x77b8380e in Olimpiada a IX-a.exe: 0xC0000374: A heap has been corrupted.

I'm not very experienced with pointers (6 months). I would appreciate any answers.

share|improve this question
    
You need to add 1 to the length to accommodate the trailing NUL character. Alternatively use strdup() or std::string objects. –  trojanfoe Feb 4 '12 at 8:16
    
*Note: when you want to work with large numbers try library such as NTL shoup.net/ntl * –  Vyktor Feb 4 '12 at 8:18
1  
You shouldn't be using pointers in this code. You should be using std::vector. I feel like I should recommend you a good introductory C++ book. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 4 '12 at 8:20
    
Oh, and welcome to StackOverflow! :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 4 '12 at 8:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your fault occurs here:

delete[] a;
a=new char[strlen(buffer)];
memset(a,'\0',maxlenght);

i.e. you've just resized your a pointer to, potentially, a smaller size, but, your maxlength variable still has the original size and can overwrite memory here. The patch would be:

delete[] a;
maxlength = strlen(buffer);
a=new char[maxlenght];
memset(a,'\0',maxlenght);

Also, I've used your mispelt maxlenght variable name. It should be maxlength.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes it was my fault that I haven't changed maxlenght Thanks for the answer –  Vali Feb 4 '12 at 14:23

Since you're doing C++ and not C, you might instead want to use the string object instead of char *. They are a lot easier to use.

But that said, this line looked a bit off to me:

memset(buffer,'\0',maxlenght);

In the event that you don't put anything into buffer, the result of strlen(buffer) will be zero. As a result, your new statement will try to allocate space for zero char elements. Perhaps that's happening here?

share|improve this answer
    
In this case, a vector is probably more appropriate than a string since the char*s are not really text. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 4 '12 at 8:23
    
Good point. Use vector<type> instead! –  Alex Reynolds Feb 4 '12 at 8:34
    
I was trying to create a class for my C++ experience and I don't know how to use strings very well I will try to use them thanks for the hint –  Vali Feb 4 '12 at 14:27

The length passed to the second memset isn't right, it should be:

memset(a,'\0',strlen(buffer));
share|improve this answer

Wrong array size on second line:

a=new char[strlen(buffer)];
memset(a,'\0',maxlenght);

And destructor is missed that causes memory leaks. Calls of strlen(buffer) are very expensive and should be cached. std::string looks better then char*.

share|improve this answer

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