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I'm new to WPF and fairly new to C# and I'm following along Head First C# 2nd Ed. p.218 (but a WPF version instead of a WinForms version). I have a TextBox on my form and I want to have a default string displayed when the form loads. I have two problems:

  1. If I set the Text property in my XAML code, the TextChanged event fires on form load and I get a NullReferenceException. Here's my XAML snippet:

    <TextBox Name="cakeWritingText" Text="Happy Birthday" TextChanged="cakeWritingText_TextChanged" />

  2. If I set the value in my code instead (and remove the XAML Text property) like this: cakeWritingText.Text = "Happy Birthday";, I get this error:

No symbols are loaded for any call stack frame. The source code cannot be displayed.

Here's the full event handler:

private void cakeWritingText_TextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e)
{
    birthdayParty.CakeWriting = cakeWritingText.Text;
    DisplayBirthdayPartyCost();
}

and the MainWindow constructor:

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    dinnerParty = new DinnerParty(5, (bool)healthyCheckBox.IsChecked, (bool)fancyCheckBox.IsChecked);          
    DisplayDinnerCost();

    birthdayParty = new BirthdayParty(5, (bool)fancyBdayCheckBox.IsChecked, cakeWritingText.Text);
    numPeopleBdayUpDown.Value = 5;
    cakeWritingText.Text = "Happy Birthday";
    DisplayBirthdayPartyCost();
}

What's the best way to put a default string in a TextBox?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The best way to set a default, hard-coded value is in the XAML, so your first approach is correct. The issue arises in your event handler of the TextChanged event. This event will be fired inside of InitializeComponent, at which point your birthdayParty variable won't have been set, hence the NullReferenceException.

To overcome this, check in your event handler that your birthdayParty variable has been initialized. So your event handler will look like this:

private void cakeWritingText_TextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e)
{
    if (birthdayParty == null)
    {
        return;
    }

    birthdayParty.CakeWriting = cakeWritingText.Text;
    DisplayBirthdayPartyCost();
}

This will obviously result in you missing the first setting of the CakeWriting property, so you will need to get this value inside your constructor, after initializing the variable.

However, if you want the CakeWriting property to always hold the value inside your TextBox, have a look into WPF Data Binding. This is the better approach to use inside of WPF synchronizing UI and data model values. Also have a read of this article about The Model-View-ViewModel Pattern, which is probably what you want to try to work towards implementing.

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You can specify a fallback value declaritively using:

<TextBox Text="{Binding MyStringProperty,FallbackValue='Not available'}" />

This assumes you are using data binding as you would if you were adopting the MVVM design pattern, which I would recommend for a number of reasons described here.

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