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I know how to generate a single random number within a given range, a list of random numbers, a list which contains a given number of random numbers but NOT a list which contains a given number of random numbers within a RANGE. Can anyone help me on this?

This code (extracted from haskell.org) generates a list of 10 random numbers, but I need to give a range, any ideas on how to edit this to give a range?

import System.Random
import Data.List

main = do
 seed  <- newStdGen
 let rs = randomlist 10 seed
 print rs

randomlist :: Int -> StdGen -> [Int]
randomlist n = take n . unfoldr (Just . random)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted
randomList :: (Random a) => (a,a) -> Int -> StdGen -> [a]
randomList bnds n = take n . randomRs bnds

Using randomRs from System.Random.

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Thanks for the answer but this code gave an error as: Cannot justify constraints in explicitly typed binding *** Expression : randomList *** Type : RandomGen a => (a,a) -> Int -> StdGen -> [a] *** Given context : RandomGen a *** Constraints : Random a –  n00b Feb 4 '12 at 11:10
    
@PraveenieNilakshikaPerera: The constraint is wrong. It should be (Random a) => ... instead of (RandomGen a) => .... –  hammar Feb 4 '12 at 12:03
    
@PraveenieNilakshikaPerera: whoops, fixed :s (that's what I get for quickly copying the usage off of the haddock docs but forgetting that the seed is class-based as well :s) –  ivanm Feb 4 '12 at 13:16
    
@ivanm can you please tell me how to call this function? I thought it's "randomList (10, 100) 10 seed" but it doesn't work, sorry I'm a noob :/ –  n00b Feb 4 '12 at 13:19
1  
You can also use randomR: randomList n = (take n .) . unfoldr . (Just .) . randomR –  danr Feb 4 '12 at 13:24

quickcheck can also be used to generate random numbers and has in fact really nice combinators that make it more understandable to formulate a generator.
To use it you just need to import one module:

import Test.QuickCheck

Defining the generator can then be done as:

t :: Int -> (Int,Int) -> Gen [Int]
t n r = vectorOf n (choose r)

To run this generator you can make use of sample':

randomList n r = head `fmap` (sample' $ t n r)
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