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Consider the following situation:

public class Storage
{
 public T GetSingleByID<T>(long id) where T : IStorable
 {
  // do some magic to return the object based on T and the id
 }
}

public class Beer : IStorable
{
}

public class BeerStorage : Storage
{
}


BeerStorage beerStorage = new BeerStorage();
Beer beer = beerStorage.GetSingleByID(5); /* compile error here */

For obvious reasons I get a compile error because the Type cannot be inferred. Fair enough. But is there a way to make the compiler able to infer the correct type based on the fact that I'm calling GetSingleByID on a BeerStorage rather than a Storage? I'd say there should be a way for the compiler to see this difference and infer T for me?

How to make a relation between Beer and BeerStorage in such a way that the compiler can infer the correct type?

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1  
There's no relationship between Beer and BeerStorage that I can see. Declaring your beer variable as a Beer doesn't really help here... –  BoltClock Feb 4 '12 at 9:29
    
@BoltClock, yes I know there isnt a relation between Beer and BeerStorage and that results in the compile error. My question is, how to make such relation? Thanks in advance. –  Bazzz Feb 4 '12 at 9:30
    
@delnal, no, obviously that won't work. But based on something else that I don't know off perhaps. Can you give me directions on how you would solve this issue? Thank you. –  Bazzz Feb 4 '12 at 9:31
1  
You should derive BeerStorage from Storage<Beer> –  CodesInChaos Feb 4 '12 at 9:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to declare the generic type parameter and constraint on your Storage class, rather than its GetSingleByID() method:

public class Storage<T> where T : IStorable
{
 public T GetSingleByID(long id)
 {
  // do some magic to return the object based on T and the id
 }
}

Then extend it to BeerStorage with Beer as the generic type like so:

public class BeerStorage : Storage<Beer>
{
}

Your calling code should then work. You can even switch the Beer declaration for the var keyword and the compiler will know that BeerStorage.GetSingleByID() returns a Beer instance:

BeerStorage beerStorage = new BeerStorage();
var beer = beerStorage.GetSingleByID(5); /* beer is a Beer instance */
share|improve this answer
    
Simple gap in my (limited) knowledge on generics. I didnt know you could specify the generic type parameter on the class. Perfect solution! Will accept answer after time period has expired. –  Bazzz Feb 4 '12 at 9:36
    
@CodeInChaos: Thanks for the edit — my copypasta process obviously needs some looking at ;) –  BoltClock Feb 4 '12 at 9:38
    
I made the same mistake at first. So when I edited my answer to fix it, I notices you made the same copypaste mistake as I did. –  CodesInChaos Feb 4 '12 at 9:39

C# does not infer generic parameters from the return value. So your code doesn't work. If you want to keep your current code, you'd need to specify T at every call site Beer beer = beerStorage.GetSingleByID<Beer>(5);.

I'd make Storage generic, and then specialize by substituting Beer for T when defining the BeerStorage class:

public class Storage<T>
  where T : IStorable
{
 public T GetSingleByID(long id) 
 {
  // do some magic to return the object based on T and the id
 }
}

public class Beer : IStorable
{
}

public class BeerStorage : Storage<Beer>
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Indeed that is the correct approach, as suggested by BoltClock as well. Thank you for your answer. –  Bazzz Feb 4 '12 at 9:37

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