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I have just read a question regarding initializing multidimensional vectors (question) and Viktor Sehr and Sbi reccomended instead using a single vector and getting the element with my_vector[x+y*100+z*100*100]. Why is this? Is it for performance reasons? If so, how does it improve performance? Thanks in advance, ell.

Edit: Do these reasons still apply when the width/height/depth are not the same and can change?

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You can't compute the index if the vector is jagged (each vector with different size). –  UncleBens Feb 4 '12 at 10:01
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Just few reasons:

It wastes spaces, it is slow (unpredictable memory access, cache waste, etc), it's cumbersome

Main performance drawback is likely to be caching. With flat arrays you are guaranteed memory to be contiguous - cache is happy. With vector of vectors - who knows!

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+1 for the performance part. –  Joachim Isaksson Feb 4 '12 at 9:53
    
I knew it would be performance related, thank you! I have updated the question a little bit so if you could answer that also I would be very grateful! –  Ell Feb 4 '12 at 9:57
    
Using flat arrays doesn't automatically mean you'll have good cache usage. If you jump around that array randomly then you'll still have bad cache usage. The main problem with the nested vectors is that you have O(n^2) pointless allocations. –  Peter Alexander Feb 4 '12 at 10:01
    
@Peter assuming sane access patterns. :) –  Anycorn Feb 4 '12 at 10:06
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This advice is sound if you're looking at a bottleneck here. If memory usage or speed of access of this vector are not critical, just go down the easiest road.

You should have a look at Boost.MultiArray which gives you best of both worlds.

If for whatever reason you cannot use Boost, I'd definitely typedef it:

typedef vector<vector<vector<int> > > My3DIntVector;

My3DIntVector v;
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MultiArray looks nice, thank you :) –  Ell Feb 4 '12 at 9:56
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…Viktor Sehr and Sbi reccomended instead using a single vector and getting the element with my_vector[x+y*100+z*100*100]. Why is this?

Given the dimensions, it's logical recommendation if the sizes are fixed.

Is it for performance reasons? If so, how does it improve performance?

Consider:

  • the number of allocations required to create all arrays
  • the time to copy even one dimension
  • the complexity it adds to the system's allocator
  • the time it takes to free
  • the complexity of common operations, such as filling

Edit: Do these reasons still apply when the width/height/depth are not the same and can change?

Resizing this (massive!) array can be extremely slow. You have to understand how your program will operate if you want it to be fastest. The copy and destruction complexity of elements is also a consideration (when using something more complex than int). If you do a lot of resizing or insertions/deletions, then the flattened vector can be very slow.

However, if its dimensions are fixed, you can do much better than std::vector. std::array is one alternative. (If you go the route of std::array, be careful of what you allocate on the stack)

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The only thing I can imagine is that this is one big block of memory and thus prevents from fragmented memory. This is much easier to cache.

A vector<vector<vector<int> > > contains a lot of chunks of memory: a chunk for the first vector, a chunk for each element in vector<> and a chunk for each element in the vector<vector<>>. This is not easy to cache and may produce hardly predictable memory usage.

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