Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to accomplish UDP hole punching. I am basing my theory on this article and this WIKI page, but I am facing some issues with the C# coding of it. Here is my problem:

Using the code that was posted here I am now able to connect to a remote machine and listen on the same port for incoming connections (Bind 2 UDP clients to the same port).

For some reason the two bindings to the same port block each other from receiving any data. I have a UDP server that responds to my connection so if I connect to it first before binding any other client to the port I get its responses back.

If I bind another client to the port no data will be received on either clients.

Following are 2 code pieces that show my problem. The first connects to a remote server to create the rule on the NAT device and then a listener is started on a different thread to capture the incoming packets. The code then sends packets to the local IP so that the listener will get it. The second only sends packets to the local IP to make sure this works. I know this is not the actual hole punching as I am sending the packets to myself without living the NAT device at all. I am facing a problem at this point, and I don't imagine this will be any different if I use a computer out side the NAT device to connect.

[EDIT] 2/4/2012 I tried using another computer on my network and WireShark (packet sniffer) to test the listener. I see the packets incoming from the other computer but are not received by the listener UDP client (udpServer) or the sender UDP client (client).

[EDIT] 2/5/2010 I have now added a function call to close the first UDP client after the initial sending and receiving of packets only living the second UDP client to listen on the port. This works and I can receive packets from inside the network on that port. I will now try to send and receive packets from outside the network. I will post my findings as soon as I find something.

Using this code I get data on the listening client:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    IPEndPoint localpt = new IPEndPoint(Dns.Resolve(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[0], 4545);

    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
    {
        UdpClient udpServer = new UdpClient();
        udpServer.ExclusiveAddressUse = false;
        udpServer.Client.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, true);
        udpServer.Client.Bind(localpt);

        IPEndPoint inEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 0);
        Console.WriteLine("Listening on " + localpt + ".");
        byte[] buffer = udpServer.Receive(ref inEndPoint); //this line will block forever
        Console.WriteLine("Receive from " + inEndPoint + " " + Encoding.ASCII.GetString(buffer) + ".");
    });

    Thread.Sleep(1000);

    UdpClient udpServer2 = new UdpClient(6000);

    // the following lines work and the data is received
    udpServer2.Connect(Dns.Resolve(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[0], 4545);
    udpServer2.Send(new byte[] { 0x41 }, 1);

    Console.Read();
}

If I use the following code, after the connection and data transfer between my client and server, the listening UDP client will not receive anything:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    IPEndPoint localpt = new IPEndPoint(Dns.Resolve(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[0], 4545);

    //if the following lines up until serverConnect(); are removed all packets are received correctly
    client = new UdpClient();
    client.ExclusiveAddressUse = false;
    client.Client.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, true);
    client.Client.Bind(localpt);
    remoteServerConnect(); //connection to remote server is done here
                           //response is received correctly and printed to the console

    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
    {
        UdpClient udpServer = new UdpClient();
        udpServer.ExclusiveAddressUse = false;
        udpServer.Client.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, true);
        udpServer.Client.Bind(localpt);

        IPEndPoint inEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 0);
        Console.WriteLine("Listening on " + localpt + ".");
        byte[] buffer = udpServer.Receive(ref inEndPoint); //this line will block forever
        Console.WriteLine("Receive from " + inEndPoint + " " + Encoding.ASCII.GetString(buffer) + ".");
    });

    Thread.Sleep(1000);

    UdpClient udpServer2 = new UdpClient(6000);

    // I expected the following line to work and to receive this as well
    udpServer2.Connect(Dns.Resolve(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[0], 4545);
    udpServer2.Send(new byte[] { 0x41 }, 1);

    Console.Read();
}
share|improve this question
    
How to deal with the situations when the packet regarding the IP or Port is lost? –  user1914692 Jul 7 at 16:36

3 Answers 3

If i understand correctly, you are trying to communicate peer-to-peer between 2 clients each behind a different NAT, using a mediation server for hole punching?

Few years ago i did the exact same thing in c#, i haven't found the code yet, but ill give you some pointers if you like:

First, I wouldn't use the Connect() function on the udpclient, since UDP is a connectionless protocol, all this function really does is hide the functionality of a UDP socket.

You should perfrom the following steps:

  1. Open a UDP socket on a server with it's ports not blocked by a firewall, at a specific port (eg Bind this socket to a chosen port for example 23000)
  2. Create a UDP socket on the first client, and send something to the server at 23000. Do not bind this socket. When a udp is used to send a packet, windows will automatically assign a free port to the socket
  3. Do the same from the other client
  4. The server has now received 2 packets from 2 clients at 2 different adresses with 2 different ports. Test if the server can send packets back on the same address and port. (If this doesn't work you did something wrong or your NAT isn't working. You know its working if you can play games without opening ports :D)
  5. The server should now send the address and port of the other clients to each connected client.
  6. A client should now be able to send packets using UDP to the adresses received from the server.

You should note that the port used on the nat is probably not the same port as on your client pc!! The server should distribute this external port to clients. You must use the external adresses and the external ports to send to!

Also note that your NAT might not support this kind of port forwarding. Some NAT's forward all incoming traffic on a assigned port to you client, which is what you want. But some nats do filtering on the incoming packets adressesses so it might block the other clients packets. This is unlikely though when using a standard personal user router.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer! I will give it a try. I think I may have not tried sending packets in both directions... –  brooc Jul 8 '12 at 5:43
2  
Okay, let me know if you get it working :) Another thing, did i understand correctly that you are binding multiple sockets to the same port? In most cases you should only use one socket per port, i didn't know it was possible to bind multiple sockets anyways :D –  MHGameWork Jul 10 '12 at 8:33

Have you tried using the Async functions, here is a example of how you might get it to work it may need a bit of work to make it 100% functional:

    public void HolePunch(String ServerIp, Int32 Port)
    {
        IPEndPoint LocalPt = new IPEndPoint(Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[0], Port);
        UdpClient Client = new UdpClient();
        Client.ExclusiveAddressUse = false;
        Client.Client.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, true);
        Client.Client.Bind(LocalPt);

        IPEndPoint RemotePt = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse(ServerIp), Port);

        // This Part Sends your local endpoint to the server so if the two peers are on the same nat they can bypass it, you can omit this if you wish to just use the remote endpoint.
        byte[] IPBuffer = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[0].ToString());
        byte[] LengthBuffer = BitConverter.GetBytes(IPBuffer.Length);
        byte[] PortBuffer = BitConverter.GetBytes(Port);
        byte[] Buffer = new byte[IPBuffer.Length + LengthBuffer.Length + PortBuffer.Length];
        LengthBuffer.CopyTo(Buffer,0);
        IPBuffer.CopyTo(Buffer, LengthBuffer.Length);
        PortBuffer.CopyTo(Buffer, IPBuffer.Length + LengthBuffer.Length);
        Client.BeginSend(Buffer, Buffer.Length, RemotePt, new AsyncCallback(SendCallback), Client);

        // Wait to receve something
        BeginReceive(Client, Port);

        // you may want to use a auto or manual ResetEvent here and have the server send back a confirmation, the server should have now stored your local (you sent it) and remote endpoint.

        // you now need to work out who you need to connect to then ask the server for there remote and local end point then need to try to connect to the local first then the remote.
        // if the server knows who you need to connect to you could just have it send you the endpoints as the confirmation.

        // you may also need to keep this open with a keepalive packet untill it is time to connect to the peer or peers.

        // once you have the endpoints of the peer you can close this connection unless you need to keep asking the server for other endpoints

        Client.Close();
    }

    public void ConnectToPeer(String PeerIp, Int32 Port)
    {
        IPEndPoint LocalPt = new IPEndPoint(Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList[0], Port);
        UdpClient Client = new UdpClient();
        Client.ExclusiveAddressUse = false;
        Client.Client.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, true);
        Client.Client.Bind(LocalPt);
        IPEndPoint RemotePt = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse(PeerIp), Port);
        Client.Connect(RemotePt);
        //you may want to keep the peer client connections in a list.

        BeginReceive(Client, Port);
    }

    public void SendCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        UdpClient Client = (UdpClient)ar.AsyncState;
        Client.EndSend(ar);
    }

    public void BeginReceive(UdpClient Client, Int32 Port)
    {
        IPEndPoint ListenPt = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, Port);

        Object[] State = new Object[] { Client, ListenPt };

        Client.BeginReceive(new AsyncCallback(ReceiveCallback), State);
    }

    public void ReceiveCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        UdpClient Client = (UdpClient)((Object[])ar.AsyncState)[0];
        IPEndPoint ListenPt = (IPEndPoint)((Object[])ar.AsyncState)[0];

        Byte[] receiveBytes = Client.EndReceive(ar, ref ListenPt);
    }

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Update:

Whichever of the UdpClients binds first is the one that will be sent incoming packets by Windows. In your example try moving the code block that sets up the listening thread to the top.

Are you sure the problem is not just that the receive thread is only written to handle a single receive? Try replacing the receive thread with as below.

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
{
    UdpClient udpServer = new UdpClient();
    udpServer.ExclusiveAddressUse = false;
    udpServer.Client.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, true);
    udpServer.Client.Bind(localpt);

    IPEndPoint inEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 0);
    Console.WriteLine("Listening on " + localpt + ".");

    while (inEndPoint != null)
    {
        byte[] buffer = udpServer.Receive(ref inEndPoint);
        Console.WriteLine("Bytes received from " + inEndPoint + " " + Encoding.ASCII.GetString(buffer) + ".");
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not receiving the first packet. The thread is blocked at the receive, putting the receive in a while loop won't work. Besides, I do see the packet getting through to my PC in the packet sniffer just not to the clients. Do you have a working example of UDP hole punching? –  brooc Feb 5 '12 at 6:31
    
Just tried it with a break point on the print line and it never reaches it. –  brooc Feb 5 '12 at 7:16
    
In theory all you need to do to create a binding in a NAT is send a packet from a private socket to a public socket. After that the NAT should pass all packets from that public socket to the private socket (at least until the binding times out which should be a minimum of X minutes). It sounds like that's what you are doing so it should work fine. –  sipwiz Feb 5 '12 at 9:56
    
At the moment I am not facing a NAT problem as I am sending and receiving packets inside the private network. Also, I am seeing the packets arrive at the PC, but are not terminated by any UDP socket, but rather discarded. It seems that for some reason the two UDP clients block each other from receiving anything. –  brooc Feb 5 '12 at 11:58
    
I have now added a function call to close the first UDP client after the initial sending and receiving of packets only living the second UDP client to listen on the port. This works and I can receive packets from inside the network on that port. I will now try to receive packets from outside the network. –  brooc Feb 5 '12 at 12:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.