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I have a simple recursive method, a depth first search. On each call, it checks if it's in a leaf, otherwise it expands the current node and calls itself on the children.

I'm trying to make it parallel, but I notice the following strange (for me) problem.

I measure execution time with System.currentTimeMillis().

When I break the search into a number of subsearches and add the total execution time, I get a bigger number than the sequential search. I only measure execution time, no communication or sync, etc. I would expect to get the same time when I add the times of the subtasks. This happens even if I just run one task after the other, so without threads. If I just break the search into some subtasks and run the subtasks one after the other, I get a bigger time. If I add the number of method calls for the subtasks, I get the same number as the sequential search. So, basically, in both cases I do the same number of method calls, but I get different times.

I'm guessing there's some overhead on initial method calls or something else caused by a JVM mechanism. Any ideas what could it be? For example, one sequential search takes around 3300 ms. If I break it into 13 tasks, it takes a total time of 3500ms.

My method looks like this:

private static final int dfs(State state) {
    method_calls++;
    if(state.isLeaf()){
            return 1;
    }
    State[] children = state.expand();
    int result = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < children.length; i++) {
            result += dfs(children[i]);
    }
    return result;
}

Whenever I call it, I do it like this:

for(int i = 0; i < num_tasks; i++){
    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    dfs(tasks[i]);
    totalTime += (System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
}

Problem is totalTime increases with num_tasks and I would expect to stay the same because the method_calls variable stays the same.

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2  
It's not really clear what you're doing - but if you could post the full code, that would really help. – Jon Skeet Feb 4 '12 at 14:28
2  
Creating threads isn't free? Pre-create your threads and use a pool (Or the ThreadPoolExecutor ) – Brian Roach Feb 4 '12 at 14:29
2  
@user16367 - context switching isn't free? As noted above, it's impossible to say without your code, but even then it would be difficult given that your difference per task is a whopping (200ms / 13) on average. Just calling System.currentTimeMillis() an additional 12 times is going to incur some overhead. – Brian Roach Feb 4 '12 at 14:45
1  
@user16367: You've added some code, but it would help if you could post a short but complete program showing both approaches, so we can measure for ourselves. – Jon Skeet Feb 4 '12 at 15:02
1  
There's no indication here that you are doing anything in parallel. The call to dfs() completes for each task before doing the next one. How are you using Threads? – Highland Mark Feb 4 '12 at 16:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should average out the numbers over longer runs. Secondly the precision of currentTimeMillis may not be sufficient, you can try using System.nanoTime().

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Doing an average did help, but not sure why. Must be something else in the code that gets amortized with multiple runs. – user16367 Feb 7 '12 at 9:22

As in all the programming languages, whenever you call a procedure or a method, you have to push the environment, initialize the new one, execute the programs instructions, return the value on the stack and finally reset the previous environment. It cost a bit! Create a thread cost also more!

I suppose that if you enlarge the researching tree you will have benefit by the parallelization.

share|improve this answer
    
But I have the same number of method calls in both cases. – user16367 Feb 4 '12 at 14:37
    
What @Brian Roach says will move the overhead at the initialization of the program (or when you want to create the pool). If you have to speed up the research and you have no problem to wait for initialization its ok! It's good also if you can reuse the pool more time! – zambotn Feb 4 '12 at 14:41
    
sorry, i was sure to wrote about the threads but i haven't do it before! :) – zambotn Feb 4 '12 at 14:45

Adding system clock time for several threads seems a weird idea. Either you are interested in the time until processing is complete, in which case adding doesn't make sense, or in cpu usage, in which case you should only count when the thread is actually scheduled to execute.

What probably happens is that at least part of the time, more threads are ready to execute than the system has cpu cores, and the scheduler puts one of your threads to sleep, which causes it to take longer to complete. It makes sense that this effect is exacerbated the more threads you use. (Even if your program uses less threads than you have cores, other programs (such as your development environment, ...) might).

If you are interested in CPU usage, you might wish to query ThreadMXBean.getCurrentThreadCpuTime

share|improve this answer

I'd expect to see Threads used. Something like this:

import java.util.concurrent.Executor;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;


public class Puzzle {

    static volatile long totalTime = 0;
    private static int method_calls = 0;

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
       final int num_tasks = 13;
       final State[] tasks = new State[num_tasks];
       ExecutorService threadPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5);
       for(int i = 0; i < num_tasks; i++){
           threadPool.submit(new DfsRunner(tasks[i]));
       }
       try {
         threadPool.shutdown();
         threadPool.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
       } catch (InterruptedException e) {
           System.out.println("Interrupted");
   }
       System.out.println(method_calls + " Methods in " + totalTime + "msecs");
    }

    static final int dfs(State state) {
        method_calls++;
        if(state.isLeaf()){
                return 1;
        }
        State[] children = state.expand();
        int result = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < children.length; i++) {
                result += dfs(children[i]);
        }
        return result;
    }
}

With the runnable bit like this:

public class DfsRunner implements Runnable {
    private State state;
    public DfsRunner(State state) {
       super();
       this.state = state;
    }
    @Override
    public void run() {
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        Puzzle.dfs(state);
        Puzzle.totalTime += (System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
    }

}
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