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I am confused about how a bit vector would work to do this (not too familiar with bit vectors). Here is the code given. Could someone please walk me through this?

public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
    int checker = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); ++i) {
        int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
        if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) return false;
        checker |= (1 << val);
    }
    return true;
}

Particularly, what is the checker doing?

share|improve this question
    
What language ? –  Paul R Feb 4 '12 at 15:48
    
It's in Java but if there's something similar in C/C++ that would be more helpful for me. –  user1136342 Feb 4 '12 at 15:51
12  
This code has been taken from Cracking The Code Interview –  Dejel Apr 27 '13 at 19:00
    
have you tested this? seems like it will fail to detect duplicate 'a' characters since it's set to 0 and left-shifting it will still keep it at 0. –  Riz Aug 1 '13 at 18:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

int checker is used here as a storage for bits. Every bit in integer value can be treated as a flag, so eventually int is an array of bits (flag). Each bit in your code states whether the character with bit's index was found in string or not. You could use bit vector for the same reason instead of int. There are two differences between them:

  • Size. int has fixed size, usually 4 bytes which means 8*4=32 bits (flags). Bit vector usually can be of different size or you should specify the size in constructor.

  • API. With bit vectors you will have easier to read code, probably something like this:

    vector.SetFlag(4, true); // set flag at index 4 as true

    for int you will have lower-level bit logic code:

    checker |= (1 << 5); // set flag at index 5 to true

Also probably int may be a little bit faster, because operations with bits are very low level and can be executed as-is by CPU. BitVector allows writing a little bit less cryptic code instead plus it can store more flags.

For future reference: bit vector is also known as bitSet or bitArray. Here are some links to this data structure for different languages/platforms:

share|improve this answer
    
Does java has a BitVector class? I couldn't find any documentation to it! –  Dejel Apr 27 '13 at 19:11
    
The size has fixed size, which is 32 bits. Is that mean it can only test 32 characters' unique? I have test that, this function could test "abcdefgZZ" is false, but "abcdefg@@" return true. –  liweijian Jan 14 at 2:12
    
Google led me here. @Dejel Here's the java data structure that you can use: docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/BitSet.html. Hopefully this helps someone traveling through the intertubes. –  nattyddubbs Jan 20 at 16:06
    
@nattyddubbs, thanks, I've added this and several other links to the answer –  Snowbear Jan 20 at 16:48

I have a sneaking suspicion you got this code from the same book I'm reading...The code itself here isn't nearly as cryptic as the the operators- |=, &, and << which aren't normally used by us layman- the author didn't bother taking the extra time out in explaining the process nor what the actual mechanics involved here are. I was content with the previous answer on this thread in the beginning but only on an abstract level. I came back to it because I felt there needed to be a more concrete explanation- the lack of one always leaves me with an uneasy feeling.

This operator << is a left bitwise shifter it takes the binary representation of that number or operand and shifts it over however many places specified by the operand or number on the right like in decimal numbers only in binaries. We are multiplying by base 2-when we move up however many places not base 10- so the number on the right is the exponent and the number on the left is a base multiple of 2.

This operator |= take the operand on the left and or's it with the operand on the right- and this one -'&'and's the bits of both operands to left and right of it.

So what we have here is a hash table which is being stored in a 32 bit binary number every time the checker gets or'd ( checker |= (1 << val)) with the designated binary value of a letter its corresponding bit it is being set to true. The character's value is and'd with the checker (checker & (1 << val)) > 0)- if it is greater than 0 we know we have a dupe- because two identical bits set to true and'd together will return true or '1''.

There are 26 binary places each of which corresponds to a lowercase letter-the author did say to assume the string only contains lowercase letters- and this is because we only have 6 more (in 32 bit integer) places left to consume- and than we get a collision

00000000000000000000000000000001 a 2^0

00000000000000000000000000000010 b 2^1

00000000000000000000000000000100 c 2^2

00000000000000000000000000001000 d 2^3

00000000000000000000000000010000 e 2^4

00000000000000000000000000100000 f 2^5

00000000000000000000000001000000 g 2^6

00000000000000000000000010000000 h 2^7

00000000000000000000000100000000 i 2^8

00000000000000000000001000000000 j 2^9

00000000000000000000010000000000 k 2^10

00000000000000000000100000000000 l 2^11

00000000000000000001000000000000 m 2^12

00000000000000000010000000000000 n 2^13

00000000000000000100000000000000 o 2^14

00000000000000001000000000000000 p 2^15

00000000000000010000000000000000 q 2^16

00000000000000100000000000000000 r 2^17

00000000000001000000000000000000 s 2^18

00000000000010000000000000000000 t 2^19

00000000000100000000000000000000 u 2^20

00000000001000000000000000000000 v 2^21

00000000010000000000000000000000 w 2^22

00000000100000000000000000000000 x 2^23

00000001000000000000000000000000 y 2^24

00000010000000000000000000000000 z 2^25

a= 00000000000000000000000000000001

checker=00000000000000000000000000000000

checker='a' or checker

checker=00000000000000000000000000000001

a and checker=0 no dupes condition

string 'az'

checker=00000000000000000000000000000001

z =00000010000000000000000000000000

z and checker=0 no dupes

checker=z or checker= 00000010000000000000000000000001

string 'azy'

checker=00000010000000000000000000000001

y =00000001000000000000000000000000

checker and y=0 no dupes condition

checker= checker or y =00000011000000000000000000000001

string 'azya'

checker= 00000011000000000000000000000001

a= 00000000000000000000000000000001

a and checker=1 we have a dupe

share|improve this answer
    
thanks I'm reading the same book and this helped a lot. Not much bit work to be done in java / c# / python in my experience so far anyway. Thanks again for the explanation! –  Fatlad Feb 22 '13 at 1:08
    
@ivan-tichy have you tested this? seems like it will fail to detect duplicate 'a' characters since it's set to 0 and left-shifting it will still keep it at 0. –  Riz Aug 1 '13 at 18:08
    
@Riz No, its always starting out with '1', the algorithm shifts 1 based on the letter. So, if the letter 'a' comes once, it will be 1, which is (....000001). –  Taylor Halliday Jul 12 at 21:32
public static void main (String[] args)
{
    //In order to understand this algorithm, it is necessary to understand the following:

    //int checker = 0;
    //Here we are using the primitive int almost like an array of size 32 where the only values can be 1 or 0
    //Since in Java, we have 4 bytes per int, 8 bits per byte, we have a total of 4x8=32 bits to work with

    //int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
    //In order to understand what is going on here, we must realize that all characters have a numeric value
    for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++)
    {
        char val = (char)i;
        System.out.print(val);
    }

    //The output is something like:
    //             !"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz{|}~ ¡¢£¤¥¦§¨©ª«¬­®¯°±²³´µ¶·¸¹º»¼½¾¿ÀÁÂÃÄÅÆÇÈÉÊËÌÍÎÏÐÑÒÓÔÕÖ×ØÙÚÛÜÝÞßàáâãäåæçèéêëìíîïðñòóôõö÷øùúûüýþÿ
    //There seems to be ~15 leading spaces that do not copy paste well, so I had to use real spaces instead

    //To only print the characters from 'a' on forward:
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println();

    for (int i=0; i < 256; i++)
    {
        char val = (char)i;
        //char val2 = val + 'a'; //incompatible types. required: char found: int
        int val2 = val + 'a';  //shift to the 'a', we must use an int here otherwise the compiler will complain
        char val3 = (char)val2;  //convert back to char. there should be a more elegant way of doing this.
        System.out.print(val3);
    }

    //Notice how the following does not work:
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println();

    for (int i=0; i < 256; i++)
    {
        char val = (char)i;
        int val2 = val - 'a';
        char val3 = (char)val2;
        System.out.print(val3);
    }
    //I'm not sure why this spills out into 2 lines:
    //EDIT I cant seem to copy this into stackoverflow!

    System.out.println();
    System.out.println();

    //So back to our original algorithm:
    //int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
    //We convert the i'th character of the String to a character, and shift it to the right, since adding shifts to the right and subtracting shifts to the left it seems

    //if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) return false;
    //This line is quite a mouthful, lets break it down:
    System.out.println(0<<0);
    //00000000000000000000000000000000
    System.out.println(0<<1);
    //00000000000000000000000000000000
    System.out.println(0<<2);
    //00000000000000000000000000000000
    System.out.println(0<<3);
    //00000000000000000000000000000000
    System.out.println(1<<0);
    //00000000000000000000000000000001
    System.out.println(1<<1);
    //00000000000000000000000000000010 == 2
    System.out.println(1<<2);
    //00000000000000000000000000000100 == 4
    System.out.println(1<<3);
    //00000000000000000000000000001000 == 8
    System.out.println(2<<0);
    //00000000000000000000000000000010 == 2
    System.out.println(2<<1);
    //00000000000000000000000000000100 == 4
    System.out.println(2<<2);
    // == 8
    System.out.println(2<<3);
    // == 16
    System.out.println("3<<0 == "+(3<<0));
    // != 4 why 3???
    System.out.println(3<<1);
    //00000000000000000000000000000011 == 3
    //shift left by 1
    //00000000000000000000000000000110 == 6
    System.out.println(3<<2);
    //00000000000000000000000000000011 == 3
    //shift left by 2
    //00000000000000000000000000001100 == 12
    System.out.println(3<<3);
    // 24

    //It seems that the -  'a' is not necessary
    //Back to if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) return false;
    //(1 << val means we simply shift 1 by the numeric representation of the current character
    //the bitwise & works as such:
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println(0&0);    //0
    System.out.println(0&1);       //0
    System.out.println(0&2);          //0
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println(1&0);    //0
    System.out.println(1&1);       //1
    System.out.println(1&2);          //0
    System.out.println(1&3);             //1
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println(2&0);    //0
    System.out.println(2&1);       //0   0010 & 0001 == 0000 = 0
    System.out.println(2&2);          //2  0010 & 0010 == 2
    System.out.println(2&3);             //2  0010 & 0011 = 0010 == 2
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println(3&0);    //0    0011 & 0000 == 0
    System.out.println(3&1);       //1  0011 & 0001 == 0001 == 1
    System.out.println(3&2);          //2  0011 & 0010 == 0010 == 2, 0&1 = 0 1&1 = 1
    System.out.println(3&3);             //3 why?? 3 == 0011 & 0011 == 3???
    System.out.println(9&11);   // should be... 1001 & 1011 == 1001 == 8+1 == 9?? yay!

    //so when we do (1 << val), we take 0001 and shift it by say, 97 for 'a', since any 'a' is also 97

    //why is it that the result of bitwise & is > 0 means its a dupe?
    //lets see..

    //0011 & 0011 is 0011 means its a dupe
    //0000 & 0011 is 0000 means no dupe
    //0010 & 0001 is 0011 means its no dupe
    //hmm
    //only when it is all 0000 means its no dupe
    //duhhhhHH!

    //so moving on:
    //checker |= (1 << val)
    //the |= needs exploring:

    int x = 0;
    int y = 1;
    int z = 2;
    int a = 3;
    int b = 4;
    System.out.println("x|=1 "+(x|=1));  //1
    System.out.println(x|=1);     //1
    System.out.println(x|=1);      //1
    System.out.println(x|=1);       //1
    System.out.println(x|=1);       //1
    System.out.println(y|=1); // 0001 |= 0001 == ?? 1????
    System.out.println(y|=2); // ??? == 3 why??? 0001 |= 0010 == 3... hmm
    System.out.println(y);  //should be 3?? yah!!
    System.out.println(y|=1); //already 3 so... 0011 |= 0001... maybe 0011 again? 3? YAHYAH!
    System.out.println(y|=2); //0011 |= 0010..... hmm maybe.. 0011??? still 3? yup!
    System.out.println(y|=3); //0011 |= 0011, still 3
    System.out.println(y|=4);  //0011 |= 0100.. should be... 0111? so... 11? no its 7, DUH 4+2+1=7
    System.out.println(y|=5);  //so we're at 7 which is 0111, 0111 |= 0101 means 0111 still 7
    System.out.println(b|=9); //so 0100 |= 1001 is... seems like xor?? or just or i think, just or... so its 1101 so its 13? YAY!

    //so the |= is just a bitwise OR!
}

public static boolean isUniqueChars(String str) {
    int checker = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); ++i) {
        int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';  //the - 'a' is just smoke and mirrors! not necessary!
        if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) return false;
        checker |= (1 << val);
    }
    return true;
}

public static boolean is_unique(String input)
{
    int using_int_as_32_flags = 0;
    for (int i=0; i < input.length(); i++)
    {
        int numeric_representation_of_char_at_i = input.charAt(i);
        int using_0001_and_shifting_it_by_the_numeric_representation = 1 << numeric_representation_of_char_at_i; //here we shift the bitwise representation of 1 by the numeric val of the character
        int result_of_bitwise_and = using_int_as_32_flags & using_0001_and_shifting_it_by_the_numeric_representation;
        boolean already_bit_flagged = result_of_bitwise_and > 0;              //needs clarification why is it that the result of bitwise & is > 0 means its a dupe?
        if (already_bit_flagged)
            return false;
        using_int_as_32_flags |= using_0001_and_shifting_it_by_the_numeric_representation;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

I also assume that your example comes from the book Cracking The Code Interview and my answer is related to this context.

In order to use this algorithm to solve the problem, we have to admit that we only are going to pass characters from a to z (lowercase).

As there is only 26 letters and these are properly sorted in the encoding table we use, this guarantees us that all the potential differences str.charAt(i) - 'a' will be inferior to 32 (the size of the int variable checker).

As explained by Snowbear, we are about to use the checker variable as an array of bits. Lets have an approach by example :

Let's say str equals "test"

  • First pass (i = t)

checker == 0 (00000000000000000000000000000000)

In ASCII, val = str.charAt(i) - 'a' = 116 - 97 = 19
What about 1 << val ?
1          == 00000000000000000000000000000001
1 << 19    == 00000000000010000000000000000000
checker |= (1 << val) means checker = checker | (1 << val)
so checker = 00000000000000000000000000000000 | 00000000000010000000000000000000
checker == 524288 (00000000000010000000000000000000)
  • Second pass (i = e)

checker == 524288 (00000000000010000000000000000000)

val = 101 - 97 = 4
1          == 00000000000000000000000000000001
1 << 4     == 00000000000000000000000000010000
checker |= (1 << val) 
so checker = 00000000000010000000000000000000 | 00000000000000000000000000010000
checker == 524304 (00000000000010000000000000010000)

and so on.. until we find an already set bit in checker for a specific character via the condition

(checker & (1 << val)) > 0

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer

In lines 4 and 5 of the question, don't these 2 statements represent the same thing?

int val = str.charAt(i) - 'a';
(1 << val) 

For example, if (str.charAt(i)) == 'b', which is 00000010 (looking only at bits 0 to 7)

int val = 0000001;
(1 << val) == 00000010;

Then, line 5 has this check ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0)

Instead, why do a - 'a' on val, why can't you simply use (checker & val) > 0)?

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not an answer. –  Daryl Spitzer Feb 24 '13 at 0:22
1  
Apart from the fact that 'b' = 98 = 0x62 = 01100010, the idea completely breaks down if you consider 'c'. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 24 '13 at 2:04

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