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I am doing some date calculations in Java using milliseconds. I do not have much experience working with milliseconds and cannot even determine how many milliseconds are in a year. Here is my attempt:

private static final int MILLIS_IN_SECOND = 1000;
    private static final int SECONDS_IN_MINUTE = 60;
    private static final int MINUTES_IN_HOUR = 60;
    private static final int HOURS_IN_DAY = 24;
    private static final int DAYS_IN_YEAR = 365; //I know this value is more like 365.24...
    private static final long MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR = MILLIS_IN_SECOND * SECONDS_IN_MINUTE * MINUTES_IN_HOUR * HOURS_IN_DAY * DAYS_IN_YEAR;


System.out.println(MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR);  //Returns 1471228928

I know that that 1 Year = 31556952000 Milliseconds, so my multiplication is off somehow.

Can anyone point out what I am doing wrong? Should I be using a long?

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2  
Why not just try it? Or look up what the max value of a 32-bit signed integer is? –  Dave Newton Feb 4 '12 at 15:18
    
@Dave Newton I have tried it and the code returns a value that I know is incorrect. An int works for milliseconds in year, however I am calculating the wrong value. –  Kevin Bowersox Feb 4 '12 at 15:21
    
Presumably leap years are irrelevant... –  Tony Hopkinson Feb 4 '12 at 16:01
    
@TonyHopkinson leap years are irrelevant. I am just using this code to make a random date between two years. I am using this date for testing purposes and I am not concerned about boundary conditions. –  Kevin Bowersox Feb 5 '12 at 19:50

8 Answers 8

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Should I be using a long?

Yes. The problem is that, since MILLIS_IN_SECOND and so on are all ints, when you multiply them you get an int. You're converting that int to a long, but only after the int multiplication has already resulted in the wrong answer.

To fix this, you can cast the first one to a long:

    private static final long MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR =
        (long)MILLIS_IN_SECOND * SECONDS_IN_MINUTE * MINUTES_IN_HOUR
        * HOURS_IN_DAY * DAYS_IN_YEAR;
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Great explanation. So does the cast turn the ints to a long before multiplying them? –  Kevin Bowersox Feb 4 '12 at 15:26
1  
@kmb385 When you multiply something with something bigger your result will always be the bigger type. –  kechapito Feb 4 '12 at 15:35
1  
@kmb385: Yes, exactly. Or, rather -- I suppose the cast itself just turns the first int into a long, but after that, Java will convert each int to a long before multiplying it by a long. –  ruakh Feb 4 '12 at 15:39
private static final long MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR = MILLIS_IN_SECOND * ...

All the operands on the right hand side are ints, so the multiplication is done with 32bit signed integers, which overflows. Cast the first one to long and you'll get the expected value.

private static final long MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR = (long)MILLIS_IN_SECOND * ...
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Or simply use Long for all the others rather than int, 16 extra bytes be damned! –  Brian Roach Feb 4 '12 at 15:27
    
Thanks for the help. I didn't know that the int overflowed, I thought I would get a runtime error. –  Kevin Bowersox Feb 4 '12 at 15:30
    
@BrianRoach: I dunno, I'd find it slightly annoying to have to cast HOURS_IN_DAY to int so I could pass it into an int-expecting function, just because someone had a misguided notion of keeping its type consistent with that of MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR. –  ruakh Feb 4 '12 at 15:42

While others have already pointed out arithmetic overflow, you can also try TimeUnit to solve the problem:

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.set(Calendar.YEAR, year);
int daysInYear = calendar.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR);
System.out.println(TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(daysInYear));
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If on android, I suggest:

android.text.format.DateUtils

DateUtils.SECOND_IN_MILLIS
DateUtils.MINUTE_IN_MILLIS
DateUtils.HOUR_IN_MILLIS
DateUtils.DAY_IN_MILLIS
DateUtils.WEEK_IN_MILLIS
DateUtils.YEAR_IN_MILLIS
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1  
In the class docs for DateUtils.YEAR_IN_MILLIS it says: "This constant is actually the length of 364 days, not of a year!" –  GregS Dec 13 '14 at 16:17

You need a long. Ints wrap around 2 billion.

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You're overflowing the int type. In Java, the result of a primitive arithmethic operation over two ints is an int. The type of the operands decides this, not the type of the result variable. Try:

private static final int MILLIS_IN_SECOND = 1000;
private static final int SECONDS_IN_MINUTE = 60;
private static final int MINUTES_IN_HOUR = 60;
private static final int HOURS_IN_DAY = 24;
private static final int DAYS_IN_YEAR = 365; //I know this value is more like 365.24...
private static final long MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR = (long) MILLIS_IN_SECOND * SECONDS_IN_MINUTE * MINUTES_IN_HOUR * HOURS_IN_DAY * DAYS_IN_YEAR;
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That worked. Thank you. –  Kevin Bowersox Feb 4 '12 at 15:22

To fix this, you can put the letter L after the first one: e.g. 1000L

long MILLS_IN_YEAR = 1000L * 60 * 60 * 24 * 365; // Returns 31536000000
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try this

    int MILLIS_IN_SECOND = 1000;
    int SECONDS_IN_MINUTE = 60;
    int MINUTES_IN_HOUR = 60;
    int HOURS_IN_DAY = 24;
    int DAYS_IN_YEAR = 365;

    long MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR = (long) MILLIS_IN_SECOND * SECONDS_IN_MINUTE * MINUTES_IN_HOUR * HOURS_IN_DAY * DAYS_IN_YEAR;

    System.out.println(MILLISECONDS_IN_YEAR); // Returns 31536000000
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