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In PHP and C# the constants can be initialized as they are declared:

class Calendar3
{
    const int value1 = 12;
    const double value2 = 0.001;
}

I have the following C++ declaration of a functor which is used with another class to compare two math vectors:

struct equal_vec
{
    bool operator() (const Vector3D& a, const Vector3D& b) const
    {
        Vector3D dist = b - a;
        return ( dist.length2() <= tolerance );
    }

    static const float tolerance = 0.001;
};

This code compiled without problems with g++. Now in C++0x mode (-std=c++0x) the g++ compiler outputs an error message:

error: ‘constexpr’ needed for in-class initialization of static data member ‘tolerance’ of non-integral type

I know I can define and initialize this static const member outside of the class definition. Also, a non-static constant data member can be initialized in the initializer list of a constructor.

But is there any way to initialize a constant within class declaration just like it is possible in PHP or C#?

Update

I used static keyword just because it was possible to initialize such constants within the class declaration in g++. I just need a way to initialize a constant in a class declaration no matter if it declared as static or not.

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2  
I used static keyword just because it was possible to initialize such constants within the class declaration in g++. I just need a way to initialize a constant in a class declaration no matter if it declared as static or not. That's the wrong way to decide whether a member should be static or not. Never let lexical laziness decide the semantics of your code. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 11 '12 at 18:17
    
That's the wrong way to decide whether a member should be static or not. I don't agree. I think that does not matter for constant members. –  ezpresso Feb 11 '12 at 19:05
2  
@expresso: Not at all. You can initialise a non-static constant member with instance-specific information. That you've decided that your constant is a property of the type rather than of a specific instance is the reason to make it static, not because you fancied a typing shortcut. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 11 '12 at 19:31
    
@lightless: Well, it is possible, but I don't see any reason for making use of initialization of same instance-specific constants with different values. I used to use non-const class fields for that! –  ezpresso Feb 11 '12 at 20:06
2  
Why, if they never change after object instantiation? struct myType { const std::time_t instantiated; myType() : instantiated(std::time(0)) {} }; Everything that can be const should be const; that applies to static and non-static members alike. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 11 '12 at 20:40
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5 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted
+50

In C++11, non-static data members, static constexpr data members, and static const data members of integral or enumeration type may be initialized in the class declaration. e.g.

struct X {
    int i=5;
    const float f=3.12f;
    static const int j=42;
    static constexpr float g=9.5f;
};

In this case, the i member of all instances of class X is initialized to 5 by the compiler-generated constructor, and the f member is initialized to 3.12. The static const data member j is initialized to 42, and the static constexpr data member g is initialized to 9.5.

Since float and double are not of integral or enumeration type, such members must either be constexpr, or non-static in order for the initializer in the class definition to be permitted.

Prior to C++11, only static const data members of integral or enumeration type could have initializers in the class definition.

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Initializing static member variables other than const int types is not standard C++ prior C++11. The gcc compiler will not warn you about this (and produce useful code nonetheless) unless you specify the -pedantic option. You then should get an error similiar to:

const.cpp:3:36: error: floating-point literal cannot appear in a constant-expression
const.cpp:3:36: warning: ISO C++ forbids initialization of member constant ‘tolerance’ of non-integral type ‘const float’ [-pedantic]

The reason for this is that the C++ standard does not specifiy how floating point should be implemented and is left to the processor. To get around this and other limitations constexpr was introduced.

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+1: Very good answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 11 '12 at 18:18
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Yes. Just add the constexpr keyword as the error says.

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Maybe he doesn't want to require C++11 for his project? –  Marc Mutz - mmutz Feb 14 '12 at 17:27
2  
The issue he mentions was introduced due to the fact he tried to compile as C++11, i.e. he would like support C++11 :) –  Unknown1987 Feb 15 '12 at 9:05
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If you only need it in the one method you can declare it locally static:

struct equal_vec
{
    bool operator() (const Vector3D& a, const Vector3D& b) const
    {
        static const float tolerance = 0.001f;
        Vector3D dist = b - a;
        return ( dist.length2() <= tolerance );
    }
};
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Well, not exactly a direct answer, but any specific reason not to use a macro?

#define tolerance 0.001
struct equal_vec
{
    bool operator() (const Vector3D& a, const Vector3D& b) const
    { 
        Vector3D dist = b - a;
        return ( dist.length2() <= tolerance );
    }
};

Not exactly good C# practice, but IMHO perfectly legit in C++.

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1  
If this struct isn't in a header (I assume it's a convenience functor), you can use an anonymous namespace and a const float instead. #define should only be used when necessary. –  Peter Wood Feb 15 '12 at 21:01
1  
Using a macro is valid, but it's generally considered not to be best practice in C++ code. –  monkey_05_06 Jan 12 '13 at 0:25
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