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What i'm trying to do is somewhat obscure, so let me show on an example (this is not the actual code):

template <class T>
class ArrayStorage {
protected:
    void processStuff(void (ArrayStorage<T>::*procedure)(T *)) {
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            (this->*procedure)(content[i]);
    }
    // No method of type void (ArrayStorage<T>::*)(T *)

private:
    T **content;
    int count;
};

class DrawableStorage : public ArrayStorage<Drawable> {
public:
    void drawStuff() {
        processStuff((void (ArrayStorage<Drawable>::*)(Drawable *)) &DrawableStorage::drawOne);
    }

private:
    void drawOne(Drawable *item) {
        item->draw();
    }
};

Basically, there is a generic container that is able to iterate through its items and use a method on each of them (whose pointer is in the parameter). This method however does not exist in this class, but only in its subclasses. You can see that in the subclass "drawStuff" method, i supply a method pointer of the sublass, but typecasted as a method of the base class.

Suprisingly enough, this has successfully compiled and works just fine.

My question is, is it just a coincidence that my particular compiler was able to handle it while in fact it is completely invalid and i should get rid of it, or is it correct usage of method pointers?

Thank you.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is legal according to $5.2.9/12:

A prvalue of type “pointer to member of D of type cv1 T” can be converted to a prvalue of type “pointer to member of B” of type cv2 T, where B is a base class (Clause 10) of D, if a valid standard conversion from “pointer to member of B of type T” to “pointer to member of D of type T” exists (4.11), and cv2 is the same cv-qualification as, or greater cv-qualification than, cv1. 69 The null member pointer value (4.11) is converted to the null member pointer value of the destination type. If class B contains the original member, or is a base or derived class of the class containing the original member, the resulting pointer to member points to the original member. Otherwise, the result of the cast is undefined. [Note: although class B need not contain the original member, the dynamic type of the object on which the pointer to member is dereferenced must contain the original member; see 5.5. —end note ]

However if you try to do this with multiple inheritance or virtual inheritance, that's when things start to break, because not all compilers implement member function pointers in a standard compliant way. On MSVC and Intel compilers all member function pointers do not have the same size, so you will lose crucial information on conversions.

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This is one of the tricks possible with pointers. It works because DrawableStorage is an ArrayStorage, and the function header matches what is expected (takes a pointer to a type matching the objects templated type and returns void).

Once the parent object has the pointer to the function, it can call it just fine even though it doesn't actually have that function as a member of itself.

While it may be a little confusing at first to read, it is a perfectly valid use of function pointers.

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Here's the simpler version of your example:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Arg
{
    int i;
};

class A;
typedef void (A::*fncptr)(Arg&);

fncptr is pointer to member function (method) of class A that takes Arg by reference. If someone gives you address of non-static function of this type, you will be able to call it only if you have an object of class A (otherwise it would have to be static function).

class A
{
public:
    A(Arg a) : a(a) { }
    void process(fncptr f){ (this->*f)(a); }

protected:
    Arg a;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B(Arg a) : A(a) { } 
    void magic(){ process((fncptr)&B::function); }
    void function(Arg& a) { cout << a.i; }
};

Here's the trick: since you are in function process which is member function of class A, you don't need pointer to an object of class A to call function f because you already have one: this. So you are able to call any function of this class or derived classes and you need only address of that function to do so.

Here's main():

int main()
{
    Arg a;
    a.i = 71;

    B* b = new B(a);
    b->magic();
    delete b;
}

output: 71

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The base class doesn't have the requested member function, so there's no way around that. However, you can make the base function a template instead:

template <typename S>
void processStuff(S * s, void (S::*procedure)(T *))
{
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) { (s->*procedure)(content[i]); }
}

Invoke it as follows:

processStuff(this, &DrawableStorage::drawOne);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, i have thought of that, but i was wondering if my version was also possible. –  Detheroc Feb 4 '12 at 16:33
    
@Detheroc: Not in the way you wrote it. If you had a virtual interface in the base class, then perhaps, but why bother if this approach is perfectly serviceable? The entire function call will probably be inlined and not cause any actual code at all. –  Kerrek SB Feb 4 '12 at 16:36

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