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I am running into problems with my Database not opening because it is already, apparently, open.

Unable to copy file "j:...\KAELC_DB.mdf" to "bin\Debug\KAELC_DB.mdf". The process cannot access the file 'j:...\KAELC_DB.mdf' because it is being used by another process.

Unable to copy file "j:...\KAELC_DB_log.ldf" to "bin\Debug\KAELC_DB_log.ldf". The process cannot access the file 'j:...\KAELC_DB_log.ldf' because it is being used by another process.

I found a reply to an old question on StackExchange, linked to here http://stackoverflow.com/a/3998383, by "Justin", which looks to resolve that problem (and I have also read in other places that "using" is one of the most efficient ways of programming in C#) but how do I use this in my code ?

I have created a small Project that does nothing but allow me to press a button in order to process a SQL statement, but I'm confused as to what "Justin" means by "Use the connection" ... how do I put SQL statements into this code ?!?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;

namespace MySqlTest
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Open SQL File
            using (SqlConnection conn = SqlHelper.GetConn())
            {
                // Use the connection <<< How ?!?!?
            }
        }

        private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Insert Record Into  SQL File

        }

        private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Read Record From SQL File

        }

        private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Read All Records From SQL File

        }

        private void button5_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Delete Record From DQL File
        }

        private void button6_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Close SQL File
        }

        private void button7_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Quit
            this.Close();
        }

        class SqlHelper
        {
            public static SqlConnection GetConn()
            {
                SqlConnection returnValue = new SqlConnection(@"Data Source=MEDESKTOP;AttachDbFilename=|DataDirectory|\SqlTestDB.mdf;Initial Catalog=MySqlDB;Integrated Security=True");
                returnValue.Open();
                return returnValue;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried looking for any documentation on SqlConnection? – Douglas Feb 4 '12 at 18:34
1  
Justin's answer has nothing to do with your problem. I presume you are getting this error during a build, inside Visual Studio? It doesn't say there are problems opening the file, but rather copying it to your bin\Debug folder. – Groo Feb 4 '12 at 18:37
    
This might be coz, you have attached u r mdf file to the sql server database ,just deattach the file from the sql server and then place it in Debug folder – Smack Feb 4 '12 at 18:43
    
@Douglas - I have been using different sites, books & videos to try and learn C#, but there seem to be dozens of different ways of doing everything and everybody seems to think their way is the best !!! I have been advised to use one site / book & stick to it, so maybe I will do that, but it is so frustrating when I do that & find that there are easier / better ways somewhere else !!! – Gary Heath Feb 4 '12 at 18:50
    
@Groo - yes, it is a debug run inside VS2010, but the problem is that (as far as I can ascertain) it can't copy it because it is already Open. If I restart my PC it works fine, so it is obviously something to do with the file being held / locked and Justin's code "insinuates" that this is avoidable ... but I need help finding out how !!! – Gary Heath Feb 4 '12 at 18:54

if all you want to do is run an SQL command, use an SQLCommand object. (MSDN docs here)

here is the sample code from the article...

private static void ReadOrderData(string connectionString)
{
    string queryString = 
        "SELECT OrderID, CustomerID FROM dbo.Orders;";
    using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection(
               connectionString))
    {
        SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(
            queryString, connection);
        connection.Open();
        SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();
        try
        {
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0}, {1}",
                    reader[0], reader[1]));
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            // Always call Close when done reading.
            reader.Close();
        }
    }
}

things to note:

  1. uses a SqlConnection object with a Using block
  2. uses an SqlCommand object
  3. uses an SqlDataReader object
  4. explicitly closes the SqlConnection with finished with it

share|improve this answer
    
Why not put the SqlDataReader in a using block as well? Then there's no need to close it. – Daniel Mann Feb 4 '12 at 19:46
    
you can put the data reader in a using. its good practice to always close your connections (etc): two rules to live by: people are stupid, and trust no one – Muad'Dib Feb 4 '12 at 20:50
    
I don't actually understand your comment. As @DBM mentioned, these classes implement IDisposable (SqlConnection, SqlCommand and SqlDataReader), and all of them should be put inside using` blocks. Writing try/finally blocks is simply more work to do, less readable and more prone to an error (you forgot to dispose the SqlCommand, for example). What's any of that have to do with "people are stupid" or "trust no one"? – Groo Feb 5 '12 at 0:03

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