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I want to convert this linear loop into a concurrent one:

for(Item item : ItemList) {
    processItem(item);
}

Is this really the shortest way to do this?

class Worker implements Runnable {
    Item item;
    Worker(Item item) {
        this.item = item;
    }
    public void Run() {
        processItem(item);
    }
}

ExecutorService exec = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(THREADPOOL_SIZE);
for(Item item : ItemList) {
    exec.execute(new Worker(item));
}
exec.shutdown();

boolean properFinish = false;
try {
    properFinish = exec.awaitTermination(50, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
} catch (InterruptedException e) { 
    Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
}

Specifically, I would like a way to use an anonymous class, but really, any way to make this shorter and more readable would be appreciated.

UPDATE: Just realized I was being a bit stupid, since it's pretty easy to use an anonymous class in this example:

for(final Item item : ItemList) {
    exec.execute(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            processItem(item);
        }
    });
}

In my original code, the loop was a simple for (i=0; i<=ItemList.length(); i++) and I couldn't think of a way to make i final in any way that makes sense. I guess using a "for each" loop make the situation better.

Still, any way to get rid of the rest of the boilerplate?

UPDATE 2: Using ExecutorCompletionService, assuming processItem returns a result.

ExecutorService exec = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(THREADPOOL_SIZE);
CompletionService<ResultType> ecs = new ExecutorCompletionService<ResultType>(executor);
for(final Item item : ItemList) {
    ecs.submit(new Callable<ResultType>() {
        public ResultType call() {
            return processItem(item);
        }
    });
}

for(Item item : item) {
    // Do whatever with the results
    ecs.take().get();
}

This does look nicer.

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Word of caution, your code above could possibly deadlock if for some reason one of your threads does not return. You may want to use the poll(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) call instead. –  Gandalf May 27 '09 at 15:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Check out the ExecutorCompletionService in JDK 6 - rather then spinning your own. It allows you to execute a number of threads for an assigned task and get the results of each thread as it's processed.

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3  
ExecutorCompletionService is in JDK5, too. –  Thilo May 27 '09 at 7:26

If you do need the results, and want them in the same order as submitted then maybe do something like:

List<Future<ResultType>> futures = new ArrayList<Future<ResultType>>();
for(final Item item : items) {
  futures.add(executor.submit(...))
}
List<ResultType> results = new ArrayList<ResultType>();
for(Future<ResultType> future : futures) {
  results.add(future.get());
}
return results;

EDIT: If you're up to some over-engineering you can return an iterator instead doing the second loop (so that the caller could start processing results before all are available):

return Iterators.transform(results, new Function<Future<ResultType>,ResultType>() {
   public ResultType apply(Future<ResultType> future) {
       return future.get();
   }
})

using "Iterators" from the google collection library. Another possibility is to just return the list of Futures and let the caller do the waiting.

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