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Whenever I try to push in Git I get this:

You have not concluded your merge (MERGE_HEAD exists).
Please, commit your changes before you can merge.

Running git status I get:

# On branch master
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

Or running git ls-files -u I get nothing.

Running git add .and trying again makes no difference.

What's up?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Okay I finally found answer: git commit -m "Test" apparently fixed this. The result was an empty commit with no changes whatsoever. Even Github shows an empty commit, but it works.

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thaaaaank youuuuuuuuu! –  KoMet Jul 21 '12 at 9:53
1  
For me this showed up as the commit marking the merge point, so a message like "Merging dev into master" would be more appropriate than "Test". –  Jeremy Herrman Oct 23 '12 at 14:56

Did you end up with an empty merge commit (two parents) or just an empty commit? In the latter case, you could have deleted .git/MERGE_HEAD.

Update: Rather than delete MERGE_HEAD by hand, you could also use git merge --abort (as of git 1.7.4) or git reset --merge (as of git 1.6.2).

It's also worth mentioning that at least as of git 1.8.3 (maybe earlier?) you should see a status message like this if an actual merge is in progress and needs to be committed (if you specified --no-commit, for example):

# On branch master
# All conflicts fixed but you are still merging.
#   (use "git commit" to conclude merge)
#
nothing to commit, working directory clean

If you don't see this and still get the MERGE_HEAD warning, something is messed up and you should probably just --abort to get back to a clean state.

Additional Detail from Comments

During a merge, git creates a MERGE_HEAD file in the root of the .git folder (next to HEAD, ORIG_HEAD, probably FETCH_HEAD, etc) to track information about the merge in progress (specifically, the SHA(s) of the commit(s) being merged into the current HEAD). If you delete that, Git will no longer think a merge is in progress. Obviously, if a merge really is in progress then you wouldn't want to delete this file.

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This solution seems more convenient for me than committing empty merges since this happens so often with git. –  C.M. Jan 2 '13 at 17:55
    
Thanks for this. Wish I really understood it. When I have time, guess I'll peruse the docs. –  Taylor Sep 4 '13 at 4:30
1  
During a merge, git creates a MERGE_HEAD file in the root of the .git folder (next to HEAD, ORIG_HEAD, probably FETCH_HEAD, etc) to track information about the merge in progress (specifically, the SHA(s) of the commit(s) being merged into the current HEAD). If you delete that, Git will no longer think a merge is in progress. Obviously, if a merge really is in progress then you wouldn't want to delete this file. –  dahlbyk Sep 5 '13 at 3:25

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