Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am able to create Python scripts and dynamically run them via Visual Studio / .NET 4.0 like this:

# testScript.py file:
import sys
sys.path.append(r'C:\Program Files (x86)\IronPython 2.7.1\Lib')
import os
os.environ['HTTP_PROXY'] = "127.0.0.1:8888"
import urllib2
response = urllib2.urlopen("http://www.google.com")

then in a .NET 4.0 WinForms project:

ScriptEngine engine = Python.CreateEngine();
ScriptSource script = engine.CreateScriptSourceFromFile("testScript.py");
ScriptScope scope = engine.CreateScope();
script.Execute(scope);

However, the IronPython DLLs that I import don't contain all the standard modules and so I have to do the

import sys
sys.path.append(r'C:\Program Files (x86)\IronPython 2.7.1\Lib')

step so that I can run the next 4 lines.

Is there some way I can avoid this?

I'm going to be publishing the application and I don't want to have to rely on the file path being the same on everyone's machine!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's an extension method that allows you to do this directly:

ScriptEngine engine = Python.CreateEngine();
ScriptSource script = engine.CreateScriptSourceFromFile("testScript.py");
ScriptScope scope = engine.CreateScope();

engine.SetSearchPaths(new string[] { "C:\\Program Files (x86)\\IronPython 2.7.1\\Lib" });
script.Execute(scope);

It's probably best to include the stdlib with your app in a private directory rather than rely on it being installed, but that's up to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Does including the standard lib meaning copying the entire "Lib" folder and all the associated .py files or is there a single file I can include. –  Chad Feb 7 '12 at 1:52
1  
No, you'd have to copy the whole folder. 2.7.2 will include zipimport so you should be able to put it in a zip file, but I haven't tried it. –  Jeff Hardy Feb 7 '12 at 20:37

If you include a copy of the Lib directory in whichever directory contains your own scripts then you could use the IRONPYTHONPATH environment variable to work around the hard-coded path.

Set the IRONPYTHONPATH before running the scripts,

Environment.SetEnvironmentVariable("IRONPYTHONPATH", @"your_scripts\Lib");
ScriptEngine engine = Python.CreateEngine();

and then you should be able to remove the path manipulation from the python scripts.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.