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Can you explain why

This one gives $? = 1

echo "uus" | grep -w -o [0123456789]\*

and this one give $? = 0

echo "-uus" | grep -w -o [0123456789]\*
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your regular expression can match an empty string. The -w flag means that any match must be preceded by beginning-of-line or a non-word character, and followed by end-of-line or a non-word character.

In the case of uus, the beginning of line is followed be a word character, so grep can't match an empty string as a word there. The end of line is preceded by a word character, so grep can't match an empty string as a word there.

In the case of -uus, the beginning of line is followed by -, which is a non-word character, so grep can match the empty string as a word between the beginning of the line and the - character.

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Why does grep -wo [0]* output two lines of output, but grep -o [0]* succeeds and outputs zero lines of output? –  William Pursell Feb 4 '12 at 20:33
    
I get zero lines of output from both of your grep commands, with either uus or -uus as the input. grep (GNU grep) 2.5.1 –  rob mayoff Feb 4 '12 at 20:36
    
Why does quoting the regex make a difference as SiegeX pointed out? I fail to understand how lack of quoting makes a difference? Can you explain that please? –  abc Feb 4 '12 at 20:47
    
As I explained in my comment on SiegeX's (now deleted) answer, putting quotes around the regex makes bash pass the backslash through to grep. Without the quotes, bash interprets and removes the backslash and grep never sees it. –  rob mayoff Feb 4 '12 at 20:49
1  
I'm guessing that you tried to put a backslash before the second star in your comment. But stackoverflow, like bash and grep, treats the backslash as a special character. You do understand that backslash is special to grep, right? And that putting quotes around the regular expression makes bash treat the backslash as not special, right? –  rob mayoff Feb 4 '12 at 21:00

grep is matching the zero length word between '-' and 'u'.

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No, it's matching the zero-length word between the beginning of the line and the -. A word match must be followed by a non-word character, and u is a word character. –  rob mayoff Feb 4 '12 at 20:13

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