Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to create a tuple from the first n elements of another tuple. This is the recursion I use (doesn't calculate anything useful here).

Weirdly, it doesn't work using g++ 4.6.1, even though as I understand it, front<0,…> is more specialized than front<n,…> and it should be selected. Is this a bug or am I confused about specialization?

#include <tuple>

template<std::size_t, typename>
struct front;

#if 0
// This works, but I only want one case.
template<typename Head, typename... Tail>
struct front<0, std::tuple<Head, Tail...>> {
    typedef std::tuple<> type;
};
template<typename Head>
struct front<0, std::tuple<Head>> {
    typedef std::tuple<> type;
};
template<>
struct front<0, std::tuple<>> {
    typedef std::tuple<> type;
};
#elseif 0
// this doesn't work, but I don't understand why:
// ambiguous class template instantiation, candidates are:
//  struct front<0u, std::tuple<_Elements ...> >
//  struct front<n, std::tuple<_Head, _Tail ...> >
template<typename... Tail>
struct front<0, std::tuple<Tail...>> {
    typedef std::tuple<> type;
};
#else
// neither does this:
// ambiguous class template instantiation, candidates are:
//  struct front<0u, T>
//  struct front<n, std::tuple<_Head, _Tail ...> >
template<typename T>
struct front<0, T> {
    typedef std::tuple<> type;
};
#endif
// this makes no sense, but it's short.
template<std::size_t n, typename Head, typename... Tail>
struct front<n, std::tuple<Head, Tail...>> {
    typedef typename front<n - 1, std::tuple<Tail...>>::type type;
};
// check all cases, error includes calculated type:
front<0, std::tuple<int, float, double, long>>::type x0 = 0;
front<2, std::tuple<int, float, double, long>>::type x2 = 0;
front<4, std::tuple<int, float, double, long>>::type x4 = 0;
share|improve this question

Template arguments aren't picked from left to right. Yes, 0 is more specialized than n, but std::tuple<Head, Tail...> is more specialized than T. You can add an extra specialization, which is the most specialized for both arguments:

#include <tuple>

template<typename A, typename B>
struct front_helper;

template<typename... A, typename... B>
struct front_helper<std::tuple<A...>, std::tuple<B...>> {
    typedef std::tuple<A..., B...> type;
};

template<std::size_t, typename>
struct front;

template<>
struct front<0, std::tuple<>> {
    typedef std::tuple<> type;
};
template<typename Head, typename... Tail>
struct front<0, std::tuple<Head, Tail...>> {
    typedef std::tuple<> type;
};
template<std::size_t n, typename Head, typename... Tail>
struct front<n, std::tuple<Head, Tail...>> {
    typedef typename front_helper<std::tuple<Head>, typename front<n-1, std::tuple<Tail...>>::type>::type type;
};

void x0(front<0, std::tuple<int, float, double, long>>::type) { }
void x1(front<1, std::tuple<int, float, double, long>>::type) { }
void x2(front<2, std::tuple<int, float, double, long>>::type) { }
void x3(front<3, std::tuple<int, float, double, long>>::type) { }
void x4(front<4, std::tuple<int, float, double, long>>::type) { }

$ g++ test.cc -c -std=c++0x && nm -C test.o
00000000 b .bss
00000000 d .data
00000000 t .text
00000000 T x0(std::tuple<>)
00000005 T x1(std::tuple<int>)
0000000a T x2(std::tuple<int, float>)
0000000f T x3(std::tuple<int, float, double>)
00000014 T x4(std::tuple<int, float, double, long>)
00000000 b std::(anonymous namespace)::ignore
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.