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I'm not using JQuery but I know they have functions to do this. I know how to do this in JQuery but I want a pure js solution.

How can I time vary the CSS opacity setting? A unix time stamp has precision to 1000 milliseconds...so that might be one way.

Using clearTimeout and setTimeout would be another way.

What is the best way to do this. I tried looking at JQuery source but could not figure out what they were doing exactly for fadeIn and fadeOut.

Related

How to eliminate unused arguments?

share|improve this question
    
SO seems like more of a library site...so I probably couldn't give you a good reason...but...here goes...b.c. I want to learn Javascript not JQuery...I feel like I can command JS better if I don't use the libraries...in the end i hope my code base will be smaller and more efficient. –  user656925 Feb 5 '12 at 0:24
    
A fair point, including jquery for one/two functions is a bit overkill most of the time. Of course you could use a cdn like google's to speed it up/cache it, just curious. I'll of course say I disagree, but I can understand your stance. –  Ben Feb 5 '12 at 0:32
    
JQuery does not use a standard coding style, also it does not use best practice in its effects functions. –  user656925 Aug 2 '12 at 18:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's an animation function using setTimeout. You can see it work here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/GcxdG/.

function toggleOpacity(id) {
    var el = document.getElementById(id);
    if (el.style.opacity == 1) {
        fadeObject(el, 1, 0, 2000)
    } else {
        fadeObject(el, 0, 1, 2000)
    }
}

function fadeObject(el, start, end, duration) {
    var range = end - start;
    var goingUp = end > start;
    var steps = duration / 20;   // arbitrarily picked 20ms for each step
    var increment = range / steps;
    var current = start;
    var more = true;
    function next() {
        current = current + increment;
        if (goingUp) {
            if (current > end) {
                current = end;
                more = false;
            }
        } else {
            if (current < end) {
                current = end;
                more = false;
            }
        }
        el.style.opacity = current;
        if (more) {
            setTimeout(next, 20);
        }
    }
    next();
}

Note: this is not yet adapted for older IE versions which don't respond to the opacity style and need to have their opacity set via an IE-specific filter setting.

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@stack.user.0 - This is longer because it's much more general purpose. You can fade between any two opacities over any duration. You can fade in or out. And, it only creates only one timer at a time rather than 100 timers. If you ever expect to use this code again, I would think you'd want the more general purpose way of doing things. –  jfriend00 Feb 5 '12 at 1:30
1  
@stack.user.0 - Yes that simplification with steps is possible. I thought the code was clearer this way which is why I wrote it this way. Correctness, reliability and clarity are all objectives that come before brevity in my coding. There are also more advanced ways of writing this (which I was contemplating when I wrote this) that don't just arbitrarily pick a 20ms step, but might adapt to the speed of the computer where the calculation of steps might be more involved or even dynamic. –  jfriend00 Feb 5 '12 at 17:43
for (var i = 1; i < 100; i += 1) { // change the += 1 for different smoothness
    (function(i) { 
        setTimeout(function() {
            el.style.opacity = (100 - i) * 0.01;
        }, i * 10);
    })(i);
}
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@icktoofay: Hmm, I thought I already did, thanks –  qwertymk Feb 5 '12 at 0:21
1  
@stack.user.0: You get the idea right? that's what I was going for –  qwertymk Feb 5 '12 at 0:23
    
anyways I can run with this for now...if you can explain the wrap that would help too..thanks! –  user656925 Feb 5 '12 at 0:29
    
@stack.user.0: because then in 10 ms when the function runs the value of i would have already changed to 100. And would be that for each iteration so it would set the opacity to 0 in 10ms then 20ms then 30ms and so on, so instead I had to copy the value in something called a closure. Google it. –  qwertymk Feb 5 '12 at 0:30
1  
I am not a fan of this technique because it sets 100 different timers rather than setting one, then setting another timer when that one fires. This isn't as general purpose a solution or as scalable as it could be. It also makes it impossible to stop the animation at any time. –  jfriend00 Feb 5 '12 at 0:49
/**
 **  SEffects - user can set the opacity fade to up or down and the specefied time
 */

var SEffects = function ( element ) {
    this.element = element;
};
SEffects.prototype.fade = function( direction, max_time ) {
    var element = this.element;
    element.elapsed = 0;
    clearTimeout( element.timeout_id );
    function next() {
        element.elapsed += 10;
        if ( direction === 'up' ) {
                element.style.opacity = element.elapsed / max_time;
            }
            else if ( direction === 'down' ) {
                element.style.opacity = ( max_time - element.elapsed ) / max_time;
            }
            if ( element.elapsed <= max_time ) {
                element.timeout_id = setTimeout( next, 10 );
            }
        }
        next();
    };
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why you posted this as an answer when you've posted it as a question here and we've already been discussing it in that other question. –  jfriend00 Feb 5 '12 at 18:34
    
revisiting....continuous improvement...here is latest version...you double linked...but I put that link up top as a reference. –  user656925 Aug 2 '12 at 17:54

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