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I have a rather big table named FTPLog with around 3 milion record I wanted to add a delete mechanism to delete old logs but delete command takes long time. I found that clustered index deleting takes long time.

DECLARE @MaxFTPLogId as bigint
SELECT @MaxFTPLogId = Max(FTPLogId) FROM FTPLog WHERE LogTime <= DATEADD(day, -10 , GETDATE())
PRINT @MaxFTPLogId
DELETE FROM FTPLog WHERE FTPLogId <= @MaxFTPLogId

I want to know how can I improve performance of deleting?

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Is the FTPLogID column indexed? –  gbn May 27 '09 at 8:45
    
Yes it is primary key –  Ahmadreza May 27 '09 at 9:22
    
How many rows are deleted, and how long does it take? –  Quassnoi May 27 '09 at 10:05
    
Are there any other indexes on the table, besides the primary key? –  Andomar May 27 '09 at 10:13
    
THere is no other indexes, I've found that first deletion is time consuming.It is about 2 milion records –  Ahmadreza May 27 '09 at 10:33

4 Answers 4

It might be slow because a large delete generates a big transaction log. Try to delete it in chunks, like:

WHILE 1 = 1
BEGIN
    DELETE TOP (256) FROM FTPLog WHERE FTPLogId <= @MaxFTPLogId
    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0
        BREAK
END

This generates smaller transactions. And it mitigates locking issues by creating breathing space for other processes.

You might also look into partitioned tables. These potentially allow you to purge old entries by dropping an entire partition.

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1  
I've always used this when performing large deletes from tables where I want to avoid locking them. Excellent recommendation. –  SqlRyan Mar 1 '10 at 6:14
1  
Always always use batches when deleting alot of data. ALWAYS. –  Dean Thomas Jan 27 '11 at 15:09

Since it's a log table, there is no need to make is clustered.

It's unlikely that you will search it on Id.

Alter your PRIMARY KEY so that it's unclustered. This will use HEAP storage method which is faster on DML:

ALTER TABLE FTPLog DROP CONSTRAINT Primary_Key_Name
ALTER TABLE FTPLog ADD CONSTRAINT Primary_Key_Name PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED (FTPLogId)

, and just issue:

SELECT @MaxFTPLogTime = DATEADD(day, -10 , GETDATE())
PRINT @MaxFTPLogId
DELETE FROM FTPLog WHERE LogTime <= @MaxFTPLogTime
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Check the density of your table (use command DBCC showcontig to check density) Scan Density [Best Count:Actual Count] this parameter should be closer to 100% and Logical Scan Fragmentation parameter should be closer to 0% for best performance of your table. If it is not, re-index and refragment the index of that table to improve performance of your query execution.

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I assume that not only this table is huge in terms of number of rows, but also that it is really heavily used for logging new entries while you try to clean it up.

Suggestion of Andomar should help, but I would try to clean it up when there are no inserts going on.

Alternative: when you write logs, you probably do not care about the transaction isolation so much. Therefore I would change transaction isolation level for the code/processes that write the log entries so that you may avoid creating huge tempdb (by the way, check if tempdb grows a lot during this DELETE operation)

Also, I think that deletions from the clustered index should not be really slower then from non-clustered one: you are still psysically deleting rows. Rebuilding this index afterward may take time though.

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Seeming ly it is not because of clustered index because I tried the solution of Quassnoi and it didnt work. –  Ahmadreza May 27 '09 at 9:27

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