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I have a model class Alert with a one-to-many relationship with another model class Occurrence, as follows:

@Entity public class Alert extends Model
{
  public String name;

  @OneToMany(cascade=CascadeType.ALL, fetch=FetchType.LAZY, mappedBy="alert")
  public List<Occurrence> occurrences;
}

@Entity public class Occurrence extends Model
{
  @ManyToOne
  public Alert alert;

  @Column(nullable=false)
  public Date alertTime;
}

I have a view that lists Alerts in a simple table, which should have a column labelled "Occurrences today", with a count of how many occurrences of the alert have happened today (by alertTime).

I can't seem to find a way to do this using only JPA/Hibernate annotations in the Alert model class, and since I am listing Alerts, I don't know of a clean way to include the count in each Alert object.

So now I am wondering if it would be fine to simply query for the alert's occurrences from within the Alert model class itself, like so:

@Entity public class Alert extends Model
{
  public String name;

  @OneToMany(cascade=CascadeType.ALL, fetch=FetchType.LAZY, mappedBy="alert")
  public List<Occurrence> occurrences;

  @Transient
  public long getOccurrencesToday()
  {
    return Occurrence.count(
      "alert = ? and alertTime >= ?",
      this, new DateMidnight().toDate());
  }
}

My question is: Is it considered bad form to make queries to the DB from within a model class?

A secondary question is: Am I approaching this the wrong way? Is there a better way to achieve the end result that I've missed?

share|improve this question
    
A clarification: My concern about executing queries from within a model class is that when a controller class caches model instances, it might not get the behaviour it expects. That is, the controller thinks it is getting slightly old data from the cache, when in fact certain properties are fetched from the DB every time. Furthermore, a view that accesses that property repeatedly may incur a non-obvious performance hit. –  Will Hains Feb 5 '12 at 23:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

While your approach is tempting, its dangerous because effectively you're putting logic into a "getter" (getOccurrencesToday()) which you'll probably access by ${alert.occurrencesToday}

A getter should always be side effect free.

I would change this to

@Entity public class Alert extends Model
{
  public String name;

  @OneToMany(cascade=CascadeType.ALL, fetch=FetchType.LAZY, mappedBy="alert")
  public List<Occurrence> occurrences;

  @Transient public Long occurrencesToday = null;

  public void populateOccurrencesToday()
  {
    occurrencesToday = Occurrence.count(
      "alert = ? and alertTime >= ?",
      this, new DateMidnight().toDate());
  }
}

then in your controller, iterate over all alerts that you're going to render and execute the populateOccurrencesToday() method. If you're now storing your object in a cache, its data will be consistent.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for your answer. I see your point, but wonder if a SELECT COUNT query really qualifies as a side effect... Hmmm... Also, while your solution is neat, it does require that the results are iterated over twice. Still, I think this is the true answer. Thanks again! –  Will Hains Feb 6 '12 at 9:41
    
the problem is not the SELECT COUNT per se, but that you put it into a getter. You cannot easily predict how often this getter is called and how often your code gets executed. e.g. if you have view code like this <code> #{if object.occurrencesToday} #{if object.occurrencesToday == 0} we have no occurrences today #{/if} #{else} #{if object.occurencesToday == 1} this happens once a day #{/if} #{else} this happens ${object.occurencesToday} times #{/else} #{/else} #{/if} </code> its hard or even impossible to tell how often play invokes the method/db. –  Dominik Dorn Feb 12 '12 at 23:04

making queries from within domain model class should be the correct way to go giving those queries are relevant to that model. To this end, I don't see any problem with your code.

From Play's philosophy, domain object is not merely a data object. It should enclose certain business logic inside. In fact pure data object is not encouraged by play. Check more on http://www.playframework.org/documentation/1.2.4/model

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed on the "anemic object model" thing -- it's been a peeve of mine for a long time. I omitted domain logic from the sample code to keep it small. :) –  Will Hains Feb 5 '12 at 23:41
    
Added a clarification to my question above... –  Will Hains Feb 5 '12 at 23:44
    
Nothing prevent you from cache the result in a model object. Just use the same cache method you use in controller –  green Feb 10 '12 at 2:18
    
Hmmm. Good point. –  Will Hains Feb 12 '12 at 1:48

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